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Concentration in the International Arms Industry¤

  • J Paul Dunne


    (University of the West of England)

  • Maria Garcia Alonso

    (University of Kent)

  • Paul Levine

    (University of Surrey)

  • Ron Smith

    (Birkbeck College. University of London)

The end of the Cold War led to a large drop in world military expenditure, rising fixed costs of developing weapons because of technological changes and a reduction of national preference for domestic weapons. Alongside these developments has been an increase in concentration in the world arms industry, which at the end of the Cold War had been very unconcentrated with concentration ratios close to the Sutton lower bound. This paper provides an empirical and theoretical analysis of this process. It examines the dynamics of the evolution of concentration and then shows that a trade model with optimal procurement decisions can capture the main features of this empirical analysis.

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Paper provided by Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol in its series Working Papers with number 0301.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:0301
Contact details of provider: Postal: 0117 328 3610
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  1. Paul Levine & Ron Smith, 2000. "Arms Export Controls and Proliferation," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 44(6), pages 885-895, December.
  2. Dunne, J. Paul, 1995. "The defense industrial base," Handbook of Defense Economics, in: Keith Hartley & Todd Sandler (ed.), Handbook of Defense Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 14, pages 399-430 Elsevier.
  3. Hart, Peter E & Oulton, Nicholas, 1996. "Growth and Size of Firms," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(438), pages 1242-52, September.
  4. Mary Carmen Garcia-Alonso, 1999. "Price competition in a model of arms trade," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 273-303.
  5. Smith, R. P., 1990. "Defence procurement and industrial structure in the U.K," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 185-205, June.
  6. Benassy, Jean-Pascal, 1996. "Taste for variety and optimum production patterns in monopolistic competition," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 41-47, July.
  7. Dunne, Paul & Hughes, Alan, 1994. "Age, Size, Growth and Survival: UK Companies in the 1980s," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(2), pages 115-40, June.
  8. Ron Smith, 2001. "The International Arms Industry Since the End of the Cold War," World Economics, World Economics, Economic & Financial Publishing, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 2(3), pages 155-166, July.
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