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Some Reflections on the Use of Administrative Data to Estimate the Net Impacts of Workforce Programs in Washington State

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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the results, methodology, and processes used in a series of net labor market impact studies done for the State of Washington over the past six years. All of the studies relied on administrative data and used a technique referred to as quasi- experimental evaluation. The program interventions were the federal- and state-funded workforce development programs. The paper sets out eight "reflections" for analysts and policy makers to consider. These reflections identify lessons learned and uncertainties or issues that need more consideration and scrutiny.

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  • Kevin Hollenbeck, 2004. "Some Reflections on the Use of Administrative Data to Estimate the Net Impacts of Workforce Programs in Washington State," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 04-109, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:04-109
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    File URL: http://research.upjohn.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1126&context=up_workingpapers
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter R. Mueser & Kenneth R. Troske & Alexey Gorislavsky, 2007. "Using State Administrative Data to Measure Program Performance," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(4), pages 761-783, November.
    2. Rajeev H. Dehejia & Sadek Wahba, 1998. "Causal Effects in Non-Experimental Studies: Re-Evaluating the Evaluation of Training Programs," NBER Working Papers 6586, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Guido W. Imbens, 2004. "Nonparametric Estimation of Average Treatment Effects Under Exogeneity: A Review," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 4-29.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    evaluation; Washington; workforce; development; data; investment; act; Hollenbeck; Upjohn;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments

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