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Monetary policy and rational asset price bubbles

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Abstract

I examine the impact of alternative monetary policy rules on a rational asset price bubble, through the lens of an overlapping generations model with nominal rigidities. A systematic increase in interest rates in response to a growing bubble is shown to enhance the fluctuations in the latter, through its positive effect on bubble growth. The optimal monetary policy seeks to strike a balance between stabilization of the bubble and stabilization of aggregate demand. The paper's main findings call into question the theoretical foundations of the case for "leaning against the wind" monetary policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Jordi Galí, 2011. "Monetary policy and rational asset price bubbles," Economics Working Papers 1293, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Aug 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:1293
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 2001. "Should Central Banks Respond to Movements in Asset Prices?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 253-257, May.
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    3. Alberto Martin & Jaume Ventura, 2012. "Economic Growth with Bubbles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(6), pages 3033-3058, October.
    4. Moritz Schularick & Alan M. Taylor, 2012. "Credit Booms Gone Bust: Monetary Policy, Leverage Cycles, and Financial Crises, 1870-2008," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(2), pages 1029-1061, April.
    5. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467-467.
    6. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
    7. repec:mtp:titles:026201761x-01 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Blanchard, Olivier, 2012. "Monetary Policy in the Wake of the Crisis," MIT Press Book Chapters,in: In the Wake of the Crisis: Leading Economists Reassess Economic Policy, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 7-13 The MIT Press.
    9. Tirole, Jean, 1985. "Asset Bubbles and Overlapping Generations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1499-1528, November.
    10. Scheinkman, Jose A & Weiss, Laurence, 1986. "Borrowing Constraints and Aggregate Economic Activity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(1), pages 23-45, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. William B English & J David López-Salido & Robert J Tetlow, 2015. "The Federal Reserve’s Framework for Monetary Policy: Recent Changes and New Questions," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 63(1), pages 22-70, May.
    2. Jordi Galí & Luca Gambetti, 2015. "The Effects of Monetary Policy on Stock Market Bubbles: Some Evidence," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 233-257, January.
    3. Leroi RAPUTSOANE, 2016. "Disaggregated Credit Extension and Financial Distress in South Africa," Journal of Economics Library, KSP Journals, vol. 3(2), pages 226-240, June.
    4. Leroi RAPUTSOANE, 2015. "The lean versus clean debate and monetary policy in South Africa," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 2(4), pages 467-480, December.
    5. Ayako Saiki & Jon Frost, 2014. "Does unconventional monetary policy affect inequality? Evidence from Japan," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(36), pages 4445-4454, December.
    6. Abdullah Yavas, 2013. "Asset Price Bubbles and Monetary Policy," Working Papers 102013, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    7. Holtemöller Oliver, 2013. "Explosive Preisentwicklung und spekulative Blasen auf Rohstoffmärkten / Explosive behavior and speculative bubbles on commodity markets," ORDO. Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, De Gruyter, vol. 64(1), pages 405-420, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy rules; stabilization policies; asset price volatility;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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