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How Middle Class are the ‘Emerging Middle’ or ‘Scooter Class’ in Indonesia? A Household Asset Approach to Social Stratification

Author

Listed:
  • Lukas Schlogl

    () (King's International Development Institute, King's College London)

  • Andy Sumner

    () (King's International Development Institute, King's College London)

Abstract

The emergence of a ‘new middle’ or a group of people that are neither poor nor in all likelihood completely secure from poverty in many middle-income countries (MICs) raises a series of questions: Is this group really a new ‘middle class’? How is this group new or different from the established ‘middle class’ or the poor or rich (however defined)? What does the new group mean for understandings of societal stratification? In this paper we take the case of Indonesia in order to explore the characteristics of this new group that is evident in many MICs. We use 5 rounds of DHS household data for the period 1994-2012 to consider the evolution of societal stratification through transportation and other assets during economic development in Indonesia.

Suggested Citation

  • Lukas Schlogl & Andy Sumner, 2014. "How Middle Class are the ‘Emerging Middle’ or ‘Scooter Class’ in Indonesia? A Household Asset Approach to Social Stratification," Working Papers in Economics and Development Studies (WoPEDS) 201407, Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University, revised May 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:unp:wpaper:201407
    as

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    File URL: http://ceds.feb.unpad.ac.id/wopeds/201407.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Durr-e-Nayab, 2011. "Estimating the Middle Class in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 50(1), pages 1-28.
    2. Alkire, Sabina & Foster, James, 2011. "Counting and multidimensional poverty measurement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 476-487, August.
    3. Luis López-Calva & Eduardo Ortiz-Juarez, 2014. "A vulnerability approach to the definition of the middle class," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(1), pages 23-47, March.
    4. Ravallion, Martin, 2010. "The Developing World's Bulging (but Vulnerable) Middle Class," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 445-454, April.
    5. Pasquale De Muro & Matteo Mazziotta & Adriano Pareto, 2011. "Composite Indices of Development and Poverty: An Application to MDGs," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 1-18, October.
    6. Anthony B. Atkinson & Andrea Brandolini, 2011. "On the identification of the “middle class”," Working Papers 217, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    7. Nancy Birdsall, 2010. "The (Indispensable) Middle Class in Developing Countries; or, The Rich and the Rest, Not the Poor and the Rest," Working Papers 207, Center for Global Development.
    8. Palma, J.G., 2011. "Homogeneous middles vs. heterogeneous tails, and the end of the ‘Inverted-U’: the share of the rich is what it's all about," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1111, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Indonesia; stratification; middle class; measurement; economic development;

    JEL classification:

    • R20 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - General
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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