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Earning Motivation and The Conventional Earning Function

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  • Muhamad Purnagunawan

    () (Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University)

Abstract

People have different motivation for having a paid job, and this might came from different expectation, value and also gender roles. Nevertheless, most analysis of earning determinant has neglected this possibility. Using data from Household, Income and Labour Dynamics (HILDA) in Australia in 2001 and 2004, this paper investigates the structure of human capital earning equation and its stability after controlling for earning motivation. The results suggest that some measure of earning motivation have effects. However, even after controlling for earning motivation, the returns to schooling and experience do not change significantly. This suggests that the conventional earning function is stable and robust with respect to the influences of earning motivation.

Suggested Citation

  • Muhamad Purnagunawan, 2008. "Earning Motivation and The Conventional Earning Function," Working Papers in Economics and Development Studies (WoPEDS) 200805, Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University, revised Sep 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:unp:wpaper:200805
    as

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    File URL: http://ceds.feb.unpad.ac.id/wopeds/200805.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ichino, Andrea & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 1999. "Lower and upper bounds of returns to schooling: An exercise in IV estimation with different instruments," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 889-901, April.
    2. Leigh, Andrew & Ryan, Chris, 2008. "Estimating returns to education using different natural experiment techniques," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 149-160, April.
    3. Preston, Alison, 1997. "Where Are We Now with Human Capital Theory in Australia?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 73(220), pages 51-78, March.
    4. Ashenfelter, Orley & Harmon, Colm & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1999. "A review of estimates of the schooling/earnings relationship, with tests for publication bias," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 453-470, November.
    5. Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 2006. "The return to schooling: Estimates from a sample of young Australian twins," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 571-587, October.
    6. Ashenfelter, Orley & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Estimates of the Economic Returns to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1157-1173, December.
    7. John Quiggin, 1999. "Human Capital Theory and Education Policy in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(2), pages 130-144.
    8. Joanna Swaffield, 2000. "Gender, Motivation, Experience and Wages," CEP Discussion Papers dp0457, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    return to education; earning motivation; wage; HILDA;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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