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HECS for TAFE: The case for extending income contingent loans

  • Bruce Chapman

    (Crawford School of Economics and Government, Australian National University)

  • Mark Rodrigues

    (Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited)

  • Chris Ryan

    (Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University)

The public vocational education and training (VET) system is now one of the few areas in Australia's tertiary education system where students are required to pay up-front fees without access to loan assistance. These arrangements may lead to sub-optimal educational outcomes to the extent that prospective students reject a VET education on the basis of short-term financial constraints. In this paper we present a case for introducing an income contingent loan to the VET sector. The economic rationale is similar to that for higher education, and the Higher Education Contribution Scheme (HECS) provides a useful template. Using data from the first three waves of the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, we establish that there are indeed significant private returns to VET qualifications. An income contingent loan is argued to enhance access to these benefits, and the collection streams are analysed for different qualifications. The form that an income contingent loan might take for VET is considered, as are the implications for the Commonwealth Government with respect to potential subsidies associated with the design parameters.

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File URL: http://www.treasury.gov.au/~/media/Treasury/Publications%20and%20Media/Publications/2007/Working%20Paper%202007%2002/Downloads/PDF/TWP%202007-02.ashx
File Function: First version, 2007
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Paper provided by The Treasury, Australian Government in its series Treasury Working Papers with number 2007-02.

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Length: 62 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2007
Date of revision: Apr 2007
Handle: RePEc:tsy:wpaper:wpaper_tsy_wp_2007_2
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  1. Chapman, Bruce, 1997. "Conceptual Issues and the Australian Experience with Income Contingent Charges for Higher Education," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(442), pages 738-51, May.
  2. Orley Ashenfelter & Colm Harmon & Hessel Oosterbeek, 1999. "A Review of Estimates of the Schooling/Earnings Relationship, with Tests for Publication Bias," Working Papers 804, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. Chapman, Bruce & Ryan, Chris, 2005. "The access implications of income-contingent charges for higher education: lessons from Australia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 491-512, October.
  4. Koenker, Roger W & Bassett, Gilbert, Jr, 1978. "Regression Quantiles," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 33-50, January.
  5. Bruce Chapman & Chris Ryan, 2002. "Income-Contingent Financing of Student Charges for Higher Education: Assessing the Australian Innovation," CEPR Discussion Papers 449, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  6. Alan Krueger & Orley Ashenfelter, 1992. "Estimates of the Economic Return to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," NBER Working Papers 4143, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. repec:ltr:wpaper:2006.04 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Griliches, Zvi & Mason, William M, 1972. "Education, Income, and Ability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(3), pages S74-S103, Part II, .
  9. Angrist, Joshua D & Krueger, Alan B, 1991. "Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Schooling and Earnings?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(4), pages 979-1014, November.
  10. Card, David, 1999. "The causal effect of education on earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1801-1863 Elsevier.
  11. Griliches, Zvi, 1977. "Estimating the Returns to Schooling: Some Econometric Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(1), pages 1-22, January.
  12. Moshe Buchinsky, 1998. "Recent Advances in Quantile Regression Models: A Practical Guideline for Empirical Research," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(1), pages 88-126.
  13. Buly A Cardak & Chris Ryan, 2006. "Why are high ability individuals from poor backgrounds under-represented at university?," Working Papers 2006.04, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
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