IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/unm/unumer/2015032.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Deindustrialisation, structural change and sustainable economic growth

Author

Listed:
  • Tregenna, Fiona

    (UNU-MERIT)

Abstract

This paper reviews the literature and empirical evidence on deindustrialisation, with a focus on premature deindustrialisation. Structural change and industrialisation have long been considered important for developing countries to 'catch up'. However, there has been widespread deindustrialisation over the past few decades, which is setting in at lower levels of income per capita and lower shares of manufacturing in the employment or GDP than earlier. Premature deindustrialisation can be defined as deindustrialisation that begins at a lower level of GDP per capita and/or at a lower level of manufacturing as a share of total employment and GDP, than is typically the case internationally. Many of the cases of premature deindustrialisation are in sub-Saharan Africa, in some instances taking the form of 'pre-industrialisation deindustrialisation'. It is argued here that premature deindustrialisation is likely to have especially negative effects on growth. In addition to being influenced by the level of income per capita and share of manufacturing in the economy when deindustrialisation begins, the effects of deindustrialisation on growth are also expected to depend on whether or not it is policy induced and the nature of the activities that are relatively contracting and expanding. The paper concludes by exploring the implications for policymakers facing deindustrialisation.

Suggested Citation

  • Tregenna, Fiona, 2015. "Deindustrialisation, structural change and sustainable economic growth," MERIT Working Papers 032, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2015032
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2015/wp2015-032.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Naudé, Wim & Szirmai, Adam & Lavopa, Alejandro, 2013. "Industrialization Lessons from BRICS: A Comparative Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 7543, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Robert Rowthorn & Ken Coutts, 2004. "De-industrialisation and the balance of payments in advanced economies," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(5), pages 767-790, September.
    3. Ricardo Hausmann & Jason Hwang & Dani Rodrik, 2007. "What you export matters," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, March.
    4. Leanne Roncolato & David Kucera, 2014. "Structural drivers of productivity and employment growth: a decomposition analysis for 81 countries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 399-424.
    5. Fiona Tregenna, 2009. "Characterising deindustrialisation: An analysis of changes in manufacturing employment and output internationally," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(3), pages 433-466, May.
    6. Tregenna, Fiona, 2011. "Manufacturing Productivity, Deindustrialization, and Reindustrialization," WIDER Working Paper Series 057, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Fiona Tregenna, 2016. "Deindustrialization and premature deindustrialization," Chapters,in: Handbook of Alternative Theories of Economic Development, chapter 38, pages 710-728 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Fiona Tregenna, 2010. "How significant is intersectoral outsourcing of employment in South Africa?," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(5), pages 1427-1457, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Foster-McGregor, Neil & Kaba, Ibrahima & Szirmai, Adam, 2015. "Structural change and the ability to sustain growth," MERIT Working Papers 048, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. repec:ura:ecregj:v:1:y:2017:i:3:p:746-763 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:streco:v:45:y:2018:i:c:p:49-63 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Mawussé K. N. Okey, 2017. "Does migration promote industrial development in Africa?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(1), pages 228-247.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    deindustrialisation; industrial development; structural change; industrial policy; manufacturing;

    JEL classification:

    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2015032. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ad Notten). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/meritnl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.