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A renaissance for social mobility and its significance for the bridge towards postsecondary education

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  • Ritzen, Jo

    () (UNU-MERIT, and Maastricht University)

Abstract

Inequality in earned wages is in our western society on the increase. Social mobility is on the decrease. The contribution of education to equality of opportunity is decreasing, because education adapts more slowly to the increasing complexities of our societies than the home and social environment of the upper class and the upper part of the middle class. These are the forewarnings of a meltdown of the nuclear fusion reactor providing the energy of our societies: trust between social groups and hope of social betterment now and in the future for the next generation. Can meltdown be prevented by education, by a renaissance of social mobility and what social engineering would be needed to bring this about? This is the main question we address here, focused on K-12 (as well as Early Childhood Development), against a substantiation of the above background. We address this question in the context of the transition from high school to postsecondary education. This paper is written for a seminar-session on the transition of youngsters through the education system, from ECD through K-12 from the perspective of the potential future participation in higher education and from the prospects of children for a future, solid position in society, which always starts with the position on the labour market.

Suggested Citation

  • Ritzen, Jo, 2011. "A renaissance for social mobility and its significance for the bridge towards postsecondary education," MERIT Working Papers 057, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2011057
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2011/wp2011-057.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Arild Aakvik & Kjell G. Salvanes & Kjell Vaage, 2005. "Educational Attainment and Family Background," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 6(3), pages 377-394, August.
    2. Maurin, Eric, 2002. "The impact of parental income on early schooling transitions: A re-examination using data over three generations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(3), pages 301-332, September.
    3. Finnie, Ross & Laporte, Christine & Lascelles, Eric, 2004. "Family Background and Access to Post-secondary Education: What Happened over the 1990s?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2004226e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    4. Ermisch, John & Francesconi, Marco, 2001. "Family Matters: Impacts of Family Background on Educational Attainments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(270), pages 137-156, May.
    5. Daron Acemoglu, 2002. "Technical Change, Inequality, and the Labor Market," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 7-72, March.
    6. Buti,Marco & Deroose,Servaas & Gaspar,Vitor & Martins,João Nogueira (ed.), 2010. "The Euro," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9789279098420, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    postsecondary education; higher education; income inequality; income distribution; job mobility; social mobility; economic development; education policy;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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