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Globalization, Neoloberalism And Labour

  • Irfan ul Haque
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    The paper discusses the issue of globalization from the perspective of employment and labour. It argues that it is the ideological basis of policy prescriptions advanced in support of globalization, rather than the increasing global interdependence, that is the real source of controversy and anxiety over globalization. The paper discusses the impact of the neoliberal policies on economic growth, employment, and income distribution, and examines the issue of labour market rigidities from the perspective of industrial as well as developing countries. It argues that developing countries face conflicting pressures: the new liberal policies prescribe liberalization of labour markets, while the organized labour in the industrial countries is pushing for higher labour standards in developing countries. The paper concludes with a section containing ideas on how the process of globalization may be humanized, so that the gains from the growth in incomes and trade are more widely shared within as well as across countries in an increasingly interdependent world.

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    File URL: http://www.unctad.org/en/docs/osgdp20047_en.pdf
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    Paper provided by United Nations Conference on Trade and Development in its series UNCTAD Discussion Papers with number 173.

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    Date of creation: 2004
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:unc:dispap:173
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    1. Jeffrey Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Progress of Global Integration," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1733, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    2. Dollar, David & Kraay, Aart, 2001. "Trade, growth, and poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2615, The World Bank.
    3. Stephen Nickell, 1997. "Unemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe versus North America," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 55-74, Summer.
    4. Francisco Rodriguez & Dani Rodrik, 1999. "Trade Policy and Economic Growth: A Skeptic's Guide to Cross-National Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7081, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Rama, Martin, 2003. "Globalization and workers in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2958, The World Bank.
    6. Rudiger Dornbusch, 1992. "The Case for Trade Liberalization in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(1), pages 69-85, Winter.
    7. Fischer, Stanley, 1993. "The role of macroeconomic factors in growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 485-512, December.
    8. Dani Rodrik, 1998. "Democracies Pay Higher Wages," NBER Working Papers 6364, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57, March.
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