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Globalization, Neoloberalism And Labour


  • Irfan ul Haque


The paper discusses the issue of globalization from the perspective of employment and labour. It argues that it is the ideological basis of policy prescriptions advanced in support of globalization, rather than the increasing global interdependence, that is the real source of controversy and anxiety over globalization. The paper discusses the impact of the neoliberal policies on economic growth, employment, and income distribution, and examines the issue of labour market rigidities from the perspective of industrial as well as developing countries. It argues that developing countries face conflicting pressures: the new liberal policies prescribe liberalization of labour markets, while the organized labour in the industrial countries is pushing for higher labour standards in developing countries. The paper concludes with a section containing ideas on how the process of globalization may be humanized, so that the gains from the growth in incomes and trade are more widely shared within as well as across countries in an increasingly interdependent world.

Suggested Citation

  • Irfan ul Haque, 2004. "Globalization, Neoloberalism And Labour," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 173, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:unc:dispap:173

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dani Rodrik, 1999. "Democracies Pay Higher Wages," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(3), pages 707-738.
    2. Stephen Nickell, 1997. "Unemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe versus North America," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 55-74, Summer.
    3. Martin Rama, 2002. "Globalization and Workers in Developing Countries," Economics Study Area Working Papers 41, East-West Center, Economics Study Area.
    4. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Process of Global Integration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 1-118.
    5. Rudiger Dornbusch, 1992. "The Case for Trade Liberalization in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(1), pages 69-85, Winter.
    6. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57.
    7. Fischer, Stanley, 1993. "The role of macroeconomic factors in growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 485-512, December.
    8. David Dollar & Aart Kraay, 2004. "Trade, Growth, and Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(493), pages 22-49, February.
    9. Francisco Rodriguez & Dani Rodrik, 1999. "Trade Policy and Economic Growth: A Skeptic's Guide to Cross-National Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7081, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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