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Globalization, Technology Tranfer And Skill Accumulation In Low-Income Countries

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  • Jörg MAYER

Abstract

Globalization has drastically improved access of technological latecomers to advanced technologies and, to the extent that technological upgrading is important for development, it provides a unique opportunity for low-income countries to raise per capita income. This paper shows that low-income countries as a group have in fact substantially increased the GDP ratio of technology imports over the past few years, but that there are large cross-country discrepancies in technology upgrading within this group. General-purpose technology continues to constitute the bulk of technology imports, while sector-specific technology used for labour-intensive activities has gained in importance. Improved access to technology imports appears not to have improved labour productivity and the demand for skilled labour in many low-income countries. To raise the benefits reaped from globalization, governments might need to make additional efforts towards a simultaneous increase in technology imports and the skill level of the domestic labour force.

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  • Jörg MAYER, 2000. "Globalization, Technology Tranfer And Skill Accumulation In Low-Income Countries," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 150, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:unc:dispap:150
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