IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uma/periwp/wp331.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Overcoming Low Political Equilibrium in Africa: Institutional Changes for Inclusive Development

Author

Listed:
  • Léonce Ndikumana

Abstract

This paper examines the role that institutions have played in the performance of African economies over the past decades. It discusses the institutional changes needed to enable African countries to reach inclusive development in the near future. The paper starts from the premise that growth and development are the outcomes of policy choices, which in turn are the outcome of a complex process of political negotiation among various stakeholders – both domestic and foreign – who have interests that may be divergent. In other words, policy choices and the resulting development outcomes constitute a political equilibrium. It is therefore important to understand how such political equilibria arise, how they persist, and how they can be shaped or altered to achieve national goals. Understanding the forces that govern policy making and the factors that drive growth and its distributional impact can shed light on how African countries can definitively overcome secular low growth and pervasive inequities; in other words how they can overcome low-development political equilibrium and achieve inclusive development.

Suggested Citation

  • Léonce Ndikumana, 2013. "Overcoming Low Political Equilibrium in Africa: Institutional Changes for Inclusive Development," Working Papers wp331, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp331
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.peri.umass.edu/fileadmin/pdf/working_papers/working_papers_301-350/WP331.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Léonce Ndikumana, 2005. "Distributional Conflict, The State, and Peacebuilding in Burundi," Working Papers wp105, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    2. Ndulu,Benno J. & O'Connell,Stephen A. & Bates,Robert H. & Collier,Paul & Soludo,Chukwuma C., 2009. "The Political Economy of Economic Growth in Africa, 1960–2000," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521127752, April.
    3. Michael A. Clemens & Steven Radelet & Rikhil Bhavnani, 2004. "Counting chickens when they hatch: The short-term effect of aid on growth," International Finance 0407010, EconWPA.
    4. Erik S. Reinert & Rainer Kattel, 2009. "The Economics of Failed, Failing, and Fragile States: Productive Structure as the Missing Link," The Other Canon Foundation and Tallinn University of Technology Working Papers in Technology Governance and Economic Dynamics 18, TUT Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance.
    5. Juma, Calestous, 2011. "The New Harvest: Agricultural Innovation in Africa," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199783199.
    6. Shimeles, Abebe, 2010. "Community based health insurance schemes in Africa: The case of Rwanda," Working Papers in Economics 463, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    7. World Bank, 2012. "World Development Report 2013
      [Informe anual del Banco Mundial de 2013 : poner fin a la pobreza extrema, promover la prosperidad compartida - informe principal]
      ," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11843.
    8. Leander Heldring & James A. Robinson, 2012. "Colonialism and Economic Development in Africa," NBER Working Papers 18566, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Channing Arndt & Paul Chinowsky & Sherman Robinson & Kenneth Strzepek & Finn Tarp & James Thurlow, 2012. "Economic Development under Climate Change," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(3), pages 369-377, August.
    10. Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Milica Uvalic, 2012. "Learning from the past: Which of the past/current development strategies are best suited to deal with the ‘quadruple crisis’?," Working Papers 116, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    11. Reynolds, Lloyd G, 1983. "The Spread of Economic Growth to the Third World: 1850-1980," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 21(3), pages 941-980, September.
    12. José Antonio Alonso, 2012. "From aid to global development policy," Working Papers 121, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    13. Janvier D. Nkurunziza & Léonce Ndikumana & Prime Nyamoya, 2012. "The Financial Sector in Burundi," NBER Working Papers 18289, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    political equilibrium; Africa; institutions; growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp331. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Judy Fogg). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/permaus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.