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Competing R&D Strategies in an Evolutionary Industry Model

  • Murat Yildizoglu

This article aims to test the relevance of learning through Genetic Algorithms, in opposition with fixed R&D rules, in a simplified version of the evolutionary industry model of Nelson and Winter. These two R&D strategies are compared from the points of view of industry performance (welfare) and firms' relative performance (competitive edge): the results of simulations clearly show that learning is a source of technological and social efficiency as well as a mean for market domination.

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Paper provided by Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg in its series Working Papers of BETA with number 9914.

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Date of creation: 1999
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Handle: RePEc:ulp:sbbeta:9914
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  1. Jonard, N. & Yfldizoglu, M., 1998. "Technological diversity in an evolutionary industry model with localized learning and network externalities," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 35-53, March.
  2. Vanessa Oltra & Murat Yildizoglu, 1999. "Non Expectations and Adaptive Behaviours: the Missing Trade-off in Models of Innovation," Working Papers of BETA 9915, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
  3. Gérard Ballot & Erol Taymaz, 1999. "Technological Change, Learning and Macro-Economic Coordination: an Evolutionary Model," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 2(2), pages 3.
  4. Vriend, Nicolaas J., 2000. "An illustration of the essential difference between individual and social learning, and its consequences for computational analyses," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 1-19, January.
  5. Thomas Brenner, 1998. "Can evolutionary algorithms describe learning processes?," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 271-283.
  6. Silverberg, Gerald & Dosi, Giovanni & Orsenigo, Luigi, 1988. "Innovation, Diversity and Diffusion: A Self-organisation Model," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(393), pages 1032-54, December.
  7. Kwasnicki, Witold & Kwasnicka, Halina, 1992. "Market, innovation, competition: An evolutionary model of industrial dynamics," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 343-368, December.
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