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Evolution, Organization and Economic Behavior

Listed editor(s):
  • Guido Buenstorf
Registered editor(s):

This new and original collection of papers focuses on the intersection of three strands of research: evolutionary economics, behavioral economics, and management studies. Combining theoretical and empirical contributions, the expert contributors demonstrate that the intersection of these fields provides a rich source of opportunities enabling researchers to find more satisfactory answers to questions that (not only evolutionary) economists have long been tackling. Topics discussed include individual agents and their interactions; the behavior and development of firm organizations; and evolving firms and their broader implications for the development of regions and entire economies.

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File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781849806282.xml
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This book is provided by Edward Elgar Publishing in its series Books with number 14183 and published in 2012.
ISBN: 9781849806282
Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:14183
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.e-elgar.com

Order Information: Web: http://www.e-elgar.com Email:


The following chapters of this book are listed in IDEAS:

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Mowery, David C. & Oxley, Joanne E. & Silverman, Brian S., 1998. "Technological overlap and interfirm cooperation: implications for the resource-based view of the firm," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 507-523, September.
  2. Uwe Cantner & Elisa Conti & Andreas Meder, 2009. "Networks and Innovation: The Role of Social Assets in Explaining Firms' Innovative Capacity," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(12), pages 1937-1956, November.
  3. Uwe Cantner & Holger Graf, 2004. "Cooperation and specialization in German technology regions," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 14(5), pages 543-562, December.
  4. Cantner, Uwe & Graf, Holger, 2006. "The network of innovators in Jena: An application of social network analysis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 463-480, May.
  5. John Cantwell & Pllar Barrera, 1998. "The Localisation Of Corporate Technological Trajectories In The Interwar Cartels: Cooperative Learning Versus An Exchange Of Knowledge," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(2-3), pages 257-290.
  6. Uwe Cantner & Andreas Meder, 2008. "Regional and technological effects of cooperation behavior," Jena Economic Research Papers 2008-014, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  7. Uwe Cantner & Andreas Meder, 2007. "Technological proximity and the choice of cooperation partner," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 2(1), pages 45-65, June.
  8. Fritsch, Michael & Franke, Grit, 2004. "Innovation, regional knowledge spillovers and R&D cooperation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 245-255, March.
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