IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uea/wcbess/14-04.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Reminders, payment method and charitable giving: evidence from an online experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Axel Sonntag

    (University of East Anglia)

  • Daniel John Zizzo

    (University of East Anglia)

Abstract

We present the results of an experiment testing whether different methods of payment in combination with different reminder intervals affect the amounts of charitable donations. Following a lab session, participants could make online donations to charity for a total duration of three months. Reminder intervals and payment methods did not affect the total amounts donated, although participants were more likely to donate at least once when receiving monthly (and not weekly) email reminders.

Suggested Citation

  • Axel Sonntag & Daniel John Zizzo, 2014. "Reminders, payment method and charitable giving: evidence from an online experiment," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 14-04, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
  • Handle: RePEc:uea:wcbess:14-04
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://ueaeco.github.io/working-papers/papers/cbess/UEA-CBESS-14-04.pdf
    File Function: main text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Huck Steffen & Rasul Imran, 2010. "Transactions Costs in Charitable Giving: Evidence from Two Field Experiments," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-35, April.
    2. Steffen Huck & Imran Rasul & Andrew Shephard, 2015. "Comparing Charitable Fundraising Schemes: Evidence from a Natural Field Experiment and a Structural Model," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 326-369, May.
    3. Dean Karlan & Margaret McConnell & Sendhil Mullainathan & Jonathan Zinman, 2016. "Getting to the Top of Mind: How Reminders Increase Saving," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 62(12), pages 3393-3411, December.
    4. Gabriel D. Carroll & James J. Choi & David Laibson & Brigitte C. Madrian & Andrew Metrick, 2009. "Optimal Defaults and Active Decisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1639-1674.
    5. Tepper, Kelly, 1994. " The Role of Labeling Processes in Elderly Consumers' Responses to Age Segmentation Cues," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(4), pages 503-519, March.
    6. Andrew Jones & Richard Marriott, 1994. "Determinants of the level and methods of charitable giving in the 1990 Family Expenditure Survey," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(11), pages 200-203.
    7. Poortinga, Wouter & Steg, Linda & Vlek, Charles & Wiersma, Gerwin, 2003. "Household preferences for energy-saving measures: A conjoint analysis," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 49-64, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    charitable giving; payment method; reminders; online experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • L31 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Nonprofit Institutions; NGOs; Social Entrepreneurship

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uea:wcbess:14-04. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Cushan). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/esueauk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.