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Children of International Migrants in Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines: A review of evidence and policies

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Abstract

This paper considers three groups of children affected by international migration: (i) children left behind by international labour migrants from the Philippines, Indonesia, and Thailand; (ii) children of Thai nationals in Japan; and (iii) children brought along by irregular migrants in Malaysia and Thailand. Based on the limited data available from published sources, the paper constructs preliminary estimates of numbers of children involved. It then synthesizes available evidence on problems and opportunities faced by the children, and on policies towards them. There are, however, important gaps in the available evidence. The paper identifies these gaps and suggests ways in which they might be filled.

Suggested Citation

  • John Bryant, 2005. "Children of International Migrants in Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines: A review of evidence and policies," Papers inwopa05/32, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa05/32
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Haaga, J. & Davanzo, J. & Peterson, C. & Peng, T.N., 1994. "Twelve-Year Follow-Up of Respondents in a Sample Survey in Peninsular Malaysia," Papers 94-19, RAND - Reprint Series.
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    Cited by:

    1. Leonardo Menchini & Gerry Redmond, 2006. "Child Consumption Poverty in South-Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States," Papers inwopa06/36, Innocenti Working Papers.
    2. Kristina A. Schapiro, 2009. "Migration and Educational Outcomes of Children," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present) HDRP-2009-57, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), revised Oct 2009.
    3. Isabel Ortiz & Matthew Cummins, 2012. "L’Inégalité Mondiale: La Répartition des Revenus dans 141 Pays," Working papers 1103, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
    4. Wang Sophie Xuefei, 2014. "The Effect of Parental Migration on the Educational Attainment of Their Left-Behind Children in Rural China," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(3), pages 1-44, July.
    5. Minhui Zhou & Rachel Murphy & Ran Tao, 2014. "Effects of Parents' Migration on the Education of Children Left Behind in Rural China," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 40(2), pages 273-292, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child poverty; migrant children; social policy;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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