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Commitment to Equity for Children, CEQ4C: Fiscal Policy, Multidimensional Poverty, and Equity in Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Jose Cuesta

    (UNICEF Office of Research, Florence)

  • Jon Jellema

    (Commitment to Equity Institute, Tulane University)

  • Yekaterina Chzhen

    (UNICEF Office of Research, Florence)

  • Lucia Ferrone

    (UNICEF Office of Research, Florence)

Abstract

Fiscal incidence analysis is the most widely used methodology to assess the distributional effects of fiscal policies. However, for 40 years, it has lacked a child lens. A child focus on the redistributive capacity of fiscal policy is increasingly important due to the disproportionate incidence of poverty among children globally. This paper provides a child-dedicated focus on fiscal incidence analysis by tracking child-relevant benefits, turning children the unit of analysis, and using multidimensional child poverty metrics. The analysis-Commitment to Equity for Children, or CEQ4C-integrates three analytical frameworks, namely, public finance, fiscal incidence analysis, and multidimensional child poverty analysis. The paper develops a proof of concept for Uganda that includes measurement, diagnostics, and a policy simulation package replicable across diverse contexts. The proof of concept confirms that CEQ4C provides a higher-resolution fiscal incidence analysis for children than the traditional fiscal incidence analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Jose Cuesta & Jon Jellema & Yekaterina Chzhen & Lucia Ferrone, 2018. "Commitment to Equity for Children, CEQ4C: Fiscal Policy, Multidimensional Poverty, and Equity in Uganda," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 81, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tul:ceqwps:81
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal incidence analysis; child poverty; equity; fiscal reforms; Uganda;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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