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Behavioural Economics: Classical and Modern

  • Selda (Ying Fang) Kao
  • K. Vela Velupillai

In this paper, the origins and development of behavioural economics, beginning with the pioneering works of Herbert Simon (1953) and Ward Edwards (1954), is traced, described and (critically) discussed, in some detail. Two kinds of behavioural economics – classical and modern – are attributed, respectively, to the two pioneers. The mathematical foundations of classical behavioural economics is identified, largely, to be in the theory of computation and computational complexity; the corresponding mathematical basis for modern behavioural economics is, on the other hand, claimed to be a notion of subjective probability (at least at its origins in the works of Ward Edwards). The economic theories of behavior, challenging various aspects of 'orthodox' theory, were decisively influenced by these two mathematical underpinnings of the two theories

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Paper provided by ASSRU - Algorithmic Social Science Research Unit in its series ASSRU Discussion Papers with number 1126.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:trn:utwpas:1126
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