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Tax Rates as Strategic Substitutes

Author

Listed:
  • Ruud A. de Mooij

    (IMF)

  • Hendrik Vrijburg

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

Abstract

This discussion paper led to a publication in 'International Tax and Public Finance' . This paper analytically derives the conditions under which the slope of the tax reaction function is negative in a classical tax competition model. If countries maximize welfare, we show that a negative slope (reflecting strategic substitutability) occurs under relatively mild conditions. Simulations suggest that strategic substitutability occurs under plausible parameter configurations. The strategic tax response is crucial for understanding tax competition games, as well as for assessing the welfare effects of partial tax unions (whereby a subset of countries coordinate their tax rates). Indeed, contrary to earlier findings that have assumed strategic complementarity in tax rates, we show that partial tax unions might reduce welfare under strategic substitutability.

Suggested Citation

  • Ruud A. de Mooij & Hendrik Vrijburg, 2012. "Tax Rates as Strategic Substitutes," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-104/VI, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20120104
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Burbidge, John B. & James A. DePater & Gordon M. Meyers & Abhijit Sengupta, 1997. "A Coalition-Formation Approach to Equilibrium Federations and Trading Blocs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(5), pages 940-956, December.
    2. Kempf, Hubert & Rota-Graziosi, Grégoire, 2010. "Endogenizing leadership in tax competition," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 768-776, October.
    3. Bucovetsky, S., 1991. "Asymmetric tax competition," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 167-181, September.
    4. Taugourdeau, Emmanuelle & Ziad, Abderrahmane, 2011. "On the existence of Nash equilibria in an asymmetric tax competition game," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(5), pages 439-445, September.
    5. Bayindir-Upmann, Thorsten & Ziad, Abderrahmanne, 2005. "Existence of equilibria in a basic tax-competition model," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-22, January.
    6. Peralta, Susana & van Ypersele, Tanguy, 2005. "Factor endowments and welfare levels in an asymmetric tax competition game," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 258-274, March.
    7. Kanbur, Ravi & Keen, Michael, 1993. "Jeux Sans Frontieres: Tax Competition and Tax Coordination When Countries Differ in Size," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 877-892, September.
    8. Hendrik Vrijburg & Ruud A. de Mooij, 2010. "Enhanced Coorporation in an asymmetric model of Tax Competition," Working Papers 1002, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2018. "Self-enforcing capital tax coordination," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 88(7), pages 915-940, September.
    2. Brülhart, Marius & Parchet, Raphaël, 2014. "Alleged tax competition: The mysterious death of bequest taxes in Switzerland," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 63-78.
    3. Chirinko, Robert S. & Wilson, Daniel J., 2017. "Tax competition among U.S. states: Racing to the bottom or riding on a seesaw?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 155(C), pages 147-163.
    4. Pal, Rupayan & Sharma, Ajay, 2018. "Preferences over public good, political delegation and leadership in tax competition," MPRA Paper 92861, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Michael P. Devereux & Simon Loretz, 2013. "What Do We Know About Corporate Tax Competition?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 66(3), pages 745-774, September.
    6. repec:aea:aejpol:v:11:y:2019:i:2:p:189-224 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Grégoire ROTA-GRAZIOSI, 2016. "Implementing Tax Coordination and Harmonization through Voluntary Commitment," Working Papers P181, FERDI.
    8. Kai A. Konrad & Marcel Thum, 2018. "The Better Route to Global Tax Coordination: Gradualism or Multilateralism?," CESifo Working Paper Series 7305, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Rosella Levaggi & Paolo Panteghini, 2018. "Public Expenditure Spillovers: An Explanation for Heterogeneous Tax Reaction Functions," CESifo Working Paper Series 7290, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Raphaël Parchet, 2019. "Are Local Tax Rates Strategic Complements or Strategic Substitutes?," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 189-224, May.
    11. Raffaele Miniaci & Paolo Panteghini & Giulia Rivolta, 2018. "The Estimation of Reaction Functions under Tax Competition," CESifo Working Paper Series 6928, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Strategic Substitutes; Asymmetry; Strategic Tax Response; Tax Coordination;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism

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