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Attention and the Art of Scientific Publishing

Listed author(s):
  • Arjo Klamer

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

  • Hendrik P. van Dalen

    ()

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam, and Scientific Council for Government Policy)

Attention is the coordination device, which makes modern science workthe way it does. A typical characteristic of attention in thescientific world is that those who seek attention are the same peoplewho are giving it. Another important feature within groups is theskewed distribution of attention. We discuss the effect thesecharacteristics have on scientific institutions. An important thesisis that scientists converge in clusters of likeminded scientists.Given the character of scientific organisation and communication weexpect that the digitalisation of scientific communication will notaffect the basic scientific institutions as the principles upon whichthe Internet and open source code projects function coincide more orless with the way science functions. The channelling of attentionwill remain an important issue as the flood of information in the ageof electronic publishing will only increase.

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File URL: http://papers.tinbergen.nl/01022.pdf
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Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 01-022/1.

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Date of creation: 26 Feb 2001
Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20010022
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  1. Hendrik P. van Dalen, 1999. "The Golden Age of Nobel Economists," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 43(2), pages 19-35, October.
  2. Josh Lerner & Jean Triole, 2000. "The Simple Economics of Open Source," NBER Working Papers 7600, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Hendrik P. Dalen & Kène Henkens, 1999. "How Influential Are Demography Journals?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 25(2), pages 229-251.
  4. Aloysius Siow, 1991. "Are First Impressions Important in Academia?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 236-255.
  5. Hodgson, Geoffrey M & Rothman, Harry, 1999. "The Editors and Authors of Economics Journals: A Case of Institutional Oligopoly?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 165-186, February.
  6. Rosen, Sherwin, 1981. "The Economics of Superstars," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(5), pages 845-858, December.
  7. David M. Levy, 1988. "The Market for Fame and Fortune," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 20(4), pages 615-625, Winter.
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