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Health Insurance Expansions and Provider Behavior: Evidence from Substance Use Disorder Providers

Author

Listed:
  • Johanna Catherine Maclean

    () (Department of Economics, Temple University)

  • Ioana Popovici

    () (Department of Sociobehavioral and Administrative Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University)

  • Elisheva Stern

    () (Department of Economics, Temple University)

Abstract

We examine how substance use disorder (SUD) treatment providers respond to private health insurance expansions induced by state parity laws for SUD treatment. We use data on the near universe of specialty SUD treatment providers in the United States 1997-2009. During this period, 16 states implemented SUD parity laws. Our findings suggest that admissions and client volumes increase following parity law passage, treatment shifts to less intensive settings, and quality is unchanged. Providers alter the type of payment they accept and patients they admit. We find no evidence that SUD parity laws improve public health, proxied by overdose deaths.

Suggested Citation

  • Johanna Catherine Maclean & Ioana Popovici & Elisheva Stern, 2015. "Health Insurance Expansions and Provider Behavior: Evidence from Substance Use Disorder Providers," DETU Working Papers 1510, Department of Economics, Temple University.
  • Handle: RePEc:tem:wpaper:1510
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    File URL: http://www.cla.temple.edu/RePEc/documents/DETU_15_10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mark McInerney, 2017. "The Affordable Care Act, Public Insurance Expansion and Opioid Overdose Mortality," Working papers 2017-23, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    2. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Brendan Saloner, 2015. "Substance Use Treatment Provider Behavior and Healthcare Reform: Evidence from Massachusetts," DETU Working Papers 1511, Department of Economics, Temple University.
    3. Antwi, Yaa Akosa & Maclean, J. Catherine, 2017. "State Health Insurance Mandates and Labor Market Outcomes: New Evidence on Old Questions," IZA Discussion Papers 10578, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Ioana Popovici & Johanna Catherine Maclean & Michael T. French, 2017. "Health Insurance and Traffic Fatalities: The Effects of Substance Use Disorder Parity Laws," NBER Working Papers 23388, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    healthcare; provider behavior; substance use disorders; health insurance mandates;

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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