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Labor Market Consequences of State Health Insurance Regulation

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  • Robert Kaestner
  • Kosali Ilayperuma Simon

Abstract

This study, based mainly on the 1989–98 March Current Population surveys, finds that state-mandated health insurance benefits and small-group health insurance reform had no statistically significant effects on labor market outcomes such as the quantity of work, wages, and whether an employee worked for a small or large firm. The number and type of state-mandated health insurance benefits were unrelated to weeks of work, wages, and the prevalence of private insurance coverage, but positively associated with weekly work hours. Extensive small-group health insurance reform was associated with a slight decline in the prevalence of private insurance coverage in small firms, and this reform affected both full- and part-time employees. Less extensive reforms were not generally related to the prevalence of private insurance coverage. Overall, the authors do not find strong evidence that insurance regulations affected labor market outcomes, although they appear to cause a small decrease in private coverage.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Kaestner & Kosali Ilayperuma Simon, 2002. "Labor Market Consequences of State Health Insurance Regulation," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(1), pages 136-159, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:56:y:2002:i:1:p:136-159
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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Klick & Sara Markowitz, 2006. "Are mental health insurance mandates effective? Evidence from suicides," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(1), pages 83-97.
    2. Kanika Kapur & José J. Escarce & M. Susan Marquis & Kosali I. Simon, 2005. "Where do the sick go? Health insurance and employment in small and large firms," Open Access publications 10197/259, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    3. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Ioana Popovici & Elisheva Stern, 2015. "Health Insurance Expansions and Provider Behavior: Evidence from Substance Use Disorder Providers," DETU Working Papers 1510, Department of Economics, Temple University.
    4. Karen Mulligan, 2015. "Contraception Use, Abortions, and Births: The Effect of Insurance Mandates," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(4), pages 1195-1217, August.
    5. Kanika Kapur & Pinar Karaca‐Mandic & Susan M. Gates & Brent Fulton, 2012. "Do Small‐Group Health Insurance Regulations Influence Small Business Size?," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 79(1), pages 231-260, March.
    6. Andersen, Martin, 2015. "Heterogeneity and the effect of mental health parity mandates on the labor market," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 74-84.
    7. Joanna N. Lahey, 2012. "The efficiency of a group‐specific mandated benefit revisited: The effect of infertility mandates," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(1), pages 63-92, December.
    8. Antwi, Yaa Akosa & Maclean, J. Catherine, 2017. "State Health Insurance Mandates and Labor Market Outcomes: New Evidence on Old Questions," IZA Discussion Papers 10578, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Kanika Kapur & José J. Escarce & M Susan Marquis & Kosali I. Simon, 2008. "Where Do The Sick Go? Health Insurance and Employment in Small and Large Firms," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 644-664, January.
    10. Jinqi Ye, 2017. "The Effects of State and Federal Mental Health Parity Laws on Working Time," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 200, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    11. repec:eee:jhecon:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:45-60 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Nasser Daneshvary & Terrence M. Clauretie, 2007. "Gender Differences In The Valuation Of Employer-Provided Health Insurance," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(4), pages 800-816, October.
    13. Nga Le Thi Quynh & Groot, Wim & Tomini, Sonila M. & Tomini, Florian, 2017. "Effects of health insurance on labour supply: A systematic review," MERIT Working Papers 017, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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