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What do we know about primary teachers’ mathematical content knowledge in South Africa? An analysis of SACMEQ 2007

Author

Listed:
  • Hamsa Venkat

    () (Wits School of Education)

  • Nicholas Spaull

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

Abstract

Primary school mathematics teachers should, at the most basic level, have mastery of the content knowledge that they are required to teach. In this paper we test empirically whether this is the case by analyzing the South African SACMEQ 2007 mathematics teacher test data which tested 401 grade 6 mathematics teachers from a nationally representative sample of primary schools. Findings indicate that 79% of grade 6 mathematics teachers showed content knowledge levels below the grade 6/7 band, and that the few remaining teachers with higher-level content knowledge are highly inequitably distributed.

Suggested Citation

  • Hamsa Venkat & Nicholas Spaull, 2014. "What do we know about primary teachers’ mathematical content knowledge in South Africa? An analysis of SACMEQ 2007," Working Papers 13/2014, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics, revised 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers218
    as

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    File URL: https://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2014/wp132014/wp-13-2014_2.pdf
    File Function: Revised version (version 2), 2014
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nicholas Spaull, 2012. "Poverty & Privilege: Primary School Inequality in South Africa," Working Papers 13/2012, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    2. Stephen Taylor, 2011. "Uncovering indicators of effective school management in South Africa using the National School Effectiveness Study," Working Papers 10/2011, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nicholas Spaull, 2016. "Disentangling the language effect in South African schools: Measuring the impact of ‘language of assessment’ in grade 3 literacy and numeracy," Working Papers 19/2016, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    2. Chris van Wyk, 2015. "An overview of Education data in South Africa: an inventory approach," Working Papers 19/2015, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    3. Gabrielle Wills & Debra Shepherd & Janeli Kotze, 2016. "Interrogating a Paradox of Performance in the WCED: A Provincial and Regional Comparison of Student Learning," Working Papers 14/2016, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    4. repec:eee:injoed:v:66:y:2019:i:c:p:78-87 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    mathematics teacher knowledge; SACMEQ; South Africa; mathematics;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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