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Base Wage Rigidities: Evidence From a Survey of Slovak Firms


  • Marianna Cervena

    () (National Bank of Slovakia, Research Department)


Building on a unique survey of how Slovak firms adjust wages and prices, this paper studies the extent to which Slovak wages are rigid and the determinants for both nominal and real wage rigidity. Compared to other countries included in the survey, Slovakia has nominal base wage rigidity that is one of the highest and real base wage rigidity that is also relatively high. Apart from looking at the anecdotal evidence, I run multinomial logit regressions to capture the relationship between real wage rigidity, nominal wage rigidity, flexible wages and a number of firm-specific and institutional characteristics. Regression results suggest that the prevalent skill-level of the workforce matters: firms with mainly low-skilled blue-collar workers face lower probabilities of wage rigidities than firms with white-collar workers. Collective bargaining coverage is also a significant determinant. Firms covered by firm-level unions face higher probabilities of both types of wage rigidities compared to firms not covered by any level of collective bargaining. On the other hand, firms facing sectoral level unions have more flexible wages than those without any collective bargaining.

Suggested Citation

  • Marianna Cervena, 2012. "Base Wage Rigidities: Evidence From a Survey of Slovak Firms," Working and Discussion Papers WP 3/2012, Research Department, National Bank of Slovakia.
  • Handle: RePEc:svk:wpaper:1018

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jonas Agell & Per Lundborg, 2003. "Survey Evidence on Wage Rigidity and Unemployment: Sweden in the 1990s," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 105(1), pages 15-30, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Toth & Katarina Valkova, 2015. "Wage Rigidities and Jobless Recovery in Slovakia: New Survey Evidence," Working and Discussion Papers OP 3/2015, Research Department, National Bank of Slovakia.

    More about this item


    nominal and real wage rigidity; survey evidence;

    JEL classification:

    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J50 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - General
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access

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