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Overtime Working in an Unregulated Labour Market

Using individual-level data on male non-managerial workers from the 1996 British New Earnings Survey, we estimate overtime hours and average premium pay equations. Among other issues, four broad questions are of central importance. (a) What are the impacts of straight-time pay and hours on overtime pay and hours? (b) Is premium pay positively related to the length of weekly overtime? (c) What is the influence of collective bargaining coverage on overtime pay and hours? (d) Does overtime working serve significantly to alter wage earnings differentials between covered and uncovered workers? These and other issues are discussed comparatively in relation to unregulated British overtime working practices and to the United States were overtime is subject to mandatory rules.

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Paper provided by University of Stirling, Division of Economics in its series Working Papers Series with number 9904.

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Date of creation: 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:stl:stlewp:9904
Contact details of provider: Postal: Division of Economics, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland FK9 4LA
Phone: +44 (0)1786 467473
Fax: +44 (0)1786 467469
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  1. Blundell, Richard William & Ham, John & Meghir, Costas, 1987. "Unemployment and Female Labour Supply," CEPR Discussion Papers 149, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. repec:tpr:qjecon:v:101:y:1986:i:3:p:513-42 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Robert A Hart & Robin J Ruffell, 1992. "The Cost of Overtime Hours in British Production Industries," Working Papers Series 92/1, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  4. Trejo, Stephen J, 1993. "Overtime Pay, Overtime Hours, and Labor Unions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(2), pages 253-78, April.
  5. David N F Bell & Robert A Hart, 1995. "Working Time in Great Britain, 1975-1990," Working Papers Series 95/9, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  6. Calmfors, Lars & Hoel, Michael, 1988. " Work Sharing and Overtime," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 90(1), pages 45-62.
  7. R A Hart & R J Ruffell, 1989. "Costs, Efficiency and Labour Demand," Working Papers Series 89/9, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  8. Bell, D. & Hart, R.A., 1998. "Unpaid Work," Working Papers Series 9803, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
    • Bell, David N F & Hart, Robert A, 1999. "Unpaid Work," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(262), pages 271-90, May.
  9. Bils, Mark, 1987. "The Cyclical Behavior of Marginal Cost and Price," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(5), pages 838-55, December.
  10. Matthew D. Shapiro, 1984. "The Dynamic Demand for Capital and Labor," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 735, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  11. Bell, D. & RA Hart & O Huebler & W Schwerdt, 1999. "Labour Market Adjustment on the Intensive Margin: A Comparative Study of Germany and the UK," Working Papers Series 9903, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  12. McDonald, John F & Moffitt, Robert A, 1980. "The Uses of Tobit Analysis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(2), pages 318-21, May.
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