IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/stc/stcp3e/2001175e.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Skill Shortages and Advanced Technology Adoption

Author

Listed:
  • Sabourin, David

Abstract

This paper investigates the extent to which establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector experience occupational skill shortages, and to the extent that they do, whether these shortages appear to act as impediments to advanced technology adoption. Plants adopting advanced technology report shortages, particularly when it comes to professionals, such as scientists and engineers, and to technical specialists. Whether these shortages pose labour-market problems depends very much on the solutions adapted by the establishments experiencing the shortages. This paper finds that labour shortages did not appear to block technology adoption since those establishments that reported shortages were also the most technologically advanced. Although they faced a greater need for skilled labour, they were able to solve their shortages.

Suggested Citation

  • Sabourin, David, 2001. "Skill Shortages and Advanced Technology Adoption," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2001175e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  • Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2001175e
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11F0019M2001175&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yves Gingras & Richard Roy, 2000. "Is There a Skill Gap in Canada?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 26(s1), pages 159-174, July.
    2. Dunne, Timothy & Schmitz, James A, Jr, 1995. "Wages, Employment Structure and Employer Size-Wage Premia: Their Relationship to Advanced-Technology Usage at US Manufacturing Establishments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 62(245), pages 89-107, February.
    3. Baldwin, John R. & Hanel, Peter & Sabourin, David, 2000. "Determinants of Innovative Activity in Canadian Manufacturing Firms: The Role of Intellectual Property Rights," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2000122e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    4. Baldwin, John & Lin, Zhengxi, 2002. "Impediments to advanced technology adoption for Canadian manufacturers," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 1-18.
    5. Mark Doms & Timothy Dunne & Kenneth R. Troske, 1997. "Workers, Wages, and Technology," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 253-290.
    6. Baldwin, John R. & Johnson, Joanne, 1995. "Human Capital Development and Innovation: The Case of Training in Small and Medium Sized Firms," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995074e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    7. Baldwin, John R. & Diverty, Brent, 1995. "Advanced Technology Use in Canadian Manufacturing Establishments," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995085e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    8. Baldwin,John R. & Gorecki,Paul, 1998. "The Dynamics of Industrial Competition," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521633574, November.
    9. Stephen Machin & John Van Reenen, 1998. "Technology and Changes in Skill Structure: Evidence from Seven OECD Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1215-1244.
    10. Baldwin, John R. & Sabourin, David, 1999. "Technology Adoption: A Comparison Between Canada and the United States," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1998119e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    11. Baldwin, John R. & Peters, Valerie, 2001. "Training as a Human Resource Strategy: The Response to Staff Shortages and Technological Change," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2001154e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    12. Bartel, Ann P & Lichtenberg, Frank R, 1987. "The Comparative Advantage of Educated Workers in Implementing New Technology," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 1-11, February.
    13. Baldwin, John & Lin, Zhengxi, 2002. "Impediments to advanced technology adoption for Canadian manufacturers," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 1-18.
    14. Donald Siegel, 1998. "The Impact Of Technological Change On Employment: Evidence From A Firm-Level Survey Of Long Island Manufacturers," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2-4), pages 227-246.
    15. Baldwin, John R. & Yates, Janice, 1999. "Innovation, Training and Success," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1999137e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    16. Baldwin, John R. & Diverty, Brent & Sabourin, David, 1995. "Technology Use and Industrial Transformation: Empirical Perspectives," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995075e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Dominique Tourigny & Can Le, 2004. "Impediments to innovation faced by Canadian manufacturing firms," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 217-250.
    2. Beckstead, Desmond & Gellatly, Guy, 2003. "The Growth and Development of New Economy Industries," The Canadian Economy in Transition 2003002e, Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis Division.
    3. Baldwin, John R. & Sabourin, David, 2002. "Enhancing Food Safety and Productivity: Technology Use in the Canadian Food Processing Industry," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2002168e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Innovation; Labour; Occupations; Science and technology;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2001175e. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Brown). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/stagvca.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.