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Individual Wealth, Reservation Wages, and Transitions into Employment

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  • Hans Bloemen

    (CentER (TiSEM))

  • Elena Stancanelli

Abstract

We investigate the relationship between financial wealth, reservation wages, and labor market transitions. Wealth is assumed to affect the level of the reservation wage and the employment probability. We test for the validity of this assumption by estimating a simultaneous‐equations model of reservation wages, labor market transitions, and wealth. The data used for the analysis relate to a sample of unemployed job searchers. We use subjective information on the reservation wage. Wealth is found to have a significantly positive impact on the reservation wage. The overall impact of wealth on the employment probability is negative though small.

Suggested Citation

  • Hans Bloemen & Elena Stancanelli, 2001. "Individual Wealth, Reservation Wages, and Transitions into Employment," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/9704, Sciences Po.
  • Handle: RePEc:spo:wpmain:info:hdl:2441/9704
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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