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Interprovincial Migration in Canada: Implications for Output and Productivity Growth, 1987-2014

Listed author(s):
  • Matthew Calver

    ()

  • Roland Tusz
  • Erika Rodrigues
Registered author(s):

    There were slightly more than 300,000 interprovincial migrants in Canadain 2014, representing 0.85 per cent of the population. Interprovincial migrationprovidessignificant economic benefits by reallocating labour from low-productivity regions with high unemployment to high productivity regions with low unemployment.A previous report released by the Centre for the Study of Living Standards estimated the impact of net interprovincial migration on aggregate output and productivity between 1987 and 2006.This study uses the same basicmethodology to provide updated estimates, which is extendedto estimatethe long-term effects.We estimatethat interprovincial migration raised GDP by $1.23 billion (chained 2007 dollars) in 2014, or 0.071 per cent of GDP. This may seem like a small amount, but migration flows are often persistent. We estimate that cumulative net migration flows over the 1987-2014 period increased GDP by $15.8 billion dollars(0.9 per cent of GDP) in 2014and generatedcumulative benefits of $146 billionover the 1987-2014 period.Mostof these gains can be attributed tomigration toAlbertaand British Columbia, which areby far the largest destinationsof net interprovincial migration.

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    File URL: http://www.csls.ca/reports/csls2015-19.pdf
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    Paper provided by Centre for the Study of Living Standards in its series CSLS Research Reports with number 2015-19.

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    Date of creation: Nov 2015
    Handle: RePEc:sls:resrep:1519
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    1. David Amirault & Daniel de Munnik & Sarah Miller, 2013. "Explaining Canada’s Regional Migration Patterns," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2013(Spring), pages 16-28.
    2. Grady, Patrick & Macmillan, Kathleen, 2007. "Interprovincial Barriers to Labour Mobility in Canada:Policy, Knowledge Gaps and Research Issues," MPRA Paper 2988, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Evan Capeluck, 2014. "Convergence Across Provincial Economies in Canada: Trends, Drivers, and Implications," CSLS Research Reports 2014-03, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    4. Harberger, Arnold C, 1998. "A Vision of the Growth Process," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 1-32, March.
    5. Lars Osberg & Daniel V. Gordon & Zhengxi Lin, 1994. "Interregional Migration and Interindustry Labour Mobility in Canada: A Simultaneous Approach," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(1), pages 58-80, February.
    6. Serge Coulombe, 2006. "Internal Migration, Asymmetric Shocks, and Interprovincial Economic Adjustments in Canada," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 29(2), pages 199-223, April.
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