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In and Out of the Capitalia Sample: Evaluating Attrition Bias

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  • Annamaria Nese
  • Niall O'Higgins

    (Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Statistiche, Università degli Studi di Salerno)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Annamaria Nese & Niall O'Higgins, 2005. "In and Out of the Capitalia Sample: Evaluating Attrition Bias," Working Papers 3_174, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Statistiche, Università degli Studi di Salerno.
  • Handle: RePEc:sep:wpaper:3_174
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Fitzgerald & Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1998. "An Analysis of Sample Attrition in Panel Data: The Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 251-299.
    2. Michele Bagella & Leonardo Becchetti & David Andrés Londono Bedoya, 2004. "Investment and Export Subsidies in Italy: Who Gets Them and What Is Their Impact on Investment and Efficiency," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 94(2), pages 61-102, March-Apr.
    3. Vella, Francis & Verbeek, Marno, 1999. "Two-step estimation of panel data models with censored endogenous variables and selection bias," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 239-263, June.
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