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Governance and Happiness: Evidence From Citizens? Perception in Pakistan

Author

Listed:
  • Sarah Abdul Rahim

    () (Institute of Business Administration)

  • Asma Hyder

    () (Institute of Business Administration)

  • Qazi Masood Ahmed

    () (Institute of Business Administartion)

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of governance on happiness of residents in a developing society. Two major aspects of governance, i.e., democratic and technical governance are used for this analysis. Governance and happiness are measured on the basis of citizen?s perceptions through a survey from all over the country. We find a significant relationship between self perceived governance and happiness. Our estimates suggest that improvement in democratic and technical governance will increase happiness of its citizens. Results carry important implications for a developing country like Pakistan to improve the government institutions and their functioning in order to increase their effectiveness.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah Abdul Rahim & Asma Hyder & Qazi Masood Ahmed, 2017. "Governance and Happiness: Evidence From Citizens? Perception in Pakistan," Proceedings of Economics and Finance Conferences 4807773, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:sek:iefpro:4807773
    as

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    File URL: https://iises.net/proceedings/8th-economics-finance-conference-london/table-of-content/detail?cid=48&iid=001&rid=7773
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    4. Frey, Bruno S & Stutzer, Alois, 2000. "Happiness, Economy and Institutions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(466), pages 918-938, October.
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    11. Syed Mubashir Ali & Rizwan Ul Haq, 2006. "Women’s Autonomy and Happiness: The Case of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 45(1), pages 121-136.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Governance; Happiness; Democratic; Technical;

    JEL classification:

    • D02 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Institutions: Design, Formation, Operations, and Impact
    • D00 - Microeconomics - - General - - - General

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