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Policies for promoting technological catch up: a post-Washington approach

Listed author(s):
  • Slavo Radosevic

    (UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies)

This paper analyses the evolution of policies for technology catch-up through three periods: import-substitution, (augmented) Washington consensus and post-Washington period. We analyse the dominant policy models and practices in each of these periods as co-evolving with the dominant academic ideas, and changing the conditions for catching-up. We develop several dimensions or building blocks that characterise the policies for technology catch-up. These dimensions are used to characterise each of the three policy periods with the objective of outlining the generic features of an emerging post-Washington approach to technology catch-up policies in relation to past approaches.

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File URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/17466/1/17466.pdf
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Paper provided by UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) in its series UCL SSEES Economics and Business working paper series with number 82.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2007
Publication status: Published in International Journal of Institutions and Economies, 1 (1) pp. 23-52. (2009)
Handle: RePEc:see:wpaper:82
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