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Information Presentation and Consumer Choice: Evidence from Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Success Rates Reports

Listed author(s):
  • Bingxiao Wu

    ()

    (Rutgers University)

Prior literature on quality disclosure focuses on whether information provision affects consumer choice. This paper extends this research and explores whether information presentation affects consumer responsiveness in the context of Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) reports. I find that after CDC releases quality information on both “success rate” and “multiple-birth rate,” with the former highlighted, consumers only respond to “success rate;” after CDC changes the format by highlighting “multiple-birth rate,” consumers start to choose clinics with lower “multiple-birth rates.” It implies that proper design of information presentation is crucial in determining the effectiveness of public reporting.

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File URL: http://www.sas.rutgers.edu/virtual/snde/wp/2014-10.pdf
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Paper provided by Rutgers University, Department of Economics in its series Departmental Working Papers with number 201410.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: 14 Jun 2014
Handle: RePEc:rut:rutres:201410
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