IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/rsc/rsceui/2011-14.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Extractive Industries and Local Development in the Peruvian Highlands: Socio-Economic Impacts of the Mid-1990s Mining Boom

Author

Listed:
  • Elisa Ticci

Abstract

Since the late Nineties, the mining sector in Peru has been experiencing a protracted period of rapid growth. This paper investigates local impacts of the mining boom on migration, on access to basic services, on labour market and on occupational distribution across sectors. By applying propensity score matching technique, mining and non-mining districts are compared. The results show that recent mining expansion has encouraged migration inflows to mining districts and affected the sectoral composition of the labor force in these areas. However, despite the great expectations and the new institutional and legislative settings, the mining growth has not produced a multiplicative effect on non-mining and non-agricultural activities and did not boost a process of economic diversification towards non-primary sector. Finally, the analysis shows a significant heterogeneity in impacts on labour opportunities and on access to basic services across rural and urban areas, and between districts with a long history of mining exploitation and new mining areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Elisa Ticci, 2011. "Extractive Industries and Local Development in the Peruvian Highlands: Socio-Economic Impacts of the Mid-1990s Mining Boom," RSCAS Working Papers 2011/14, European University Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:rsc:rsceui:2011/14
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cadmus.eui.eu/bitstream/handle/1814/15994/RSCAS_2011_14.pdf?sequence=1
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eduardo Zegarra & José Carlos Orihuela & Maritza Paredes, 2007. "¿Minería y economía de los hogares en la sierra peruana: impactos y espacios de conflicto," Documentos de Investigación dt51, Grupo de Análisis para el Desarrollo (GRADE).
    2. Poelhekke, Steven & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2007. "Volatility, Financial Development and the Natural Resource Curse," CEPR Discussion Papers 6513, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Ning Ding & Barry C. Field, 2005. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growths," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(4).
    4. Yelpaala, Kaakpema & Ali, Saleem H., 2005. "Multiple scales of diamond mining in Akwatia, Ghana: addressing environmental and human development impact," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 145-155, September.
    5. Anthony Bebbington & Leonith Hinojosa & Denise Humphreys Bebbington & Maria Luisa Burneo & Ximena Warnaars, 2008. "Contention and Ambiguity: Mining and the Possibilities of Development," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 5708, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    6. Kuramoto, Juana R., 2001. "Las aglomeraciones mineras en Perú," Copublicaciones, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 1712, September.
    7. Sascha O. Becker & Andrea Ichino, 2002. "Estimation of average treatment effects based on propensity scores," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(4), pages 358-377, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ticci, Elisa & Escobal, Javier, 2015. "Extractive industries and local development in the Peruvian Highlands," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(01), pages 101-126, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    extractive industry; Peru; local development;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rsc:rsceui:2011/14. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (RSCAS web unit). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/rsiueit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.