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Textual sentiment in finance: A survey of methods and models

Author

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  • Colm Kearney
  • Sha Liu

Abstract

We survey the textual sentiment literature, comparing and contrasting the various information sources, content analysis methods, and empirical models that have been used to date. We summarize the important and influential findings about how textual sentiment impacts on individual, firm-level and market-level behavior and performance, and vice versa. We point to what is agreed and what remains controversial. Promising directions for future research are emerging from the availability of more accurate and efficient sentiment measures resulting from increasingly sophisticated textual content analysis coupled with more extensive field-specific dictionaries. This is enabling more wide-ranging studies that use increasingly sophisticated models to help us better understand behavioral finance patterns across individuals, institutions and markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Colm Kearney & Sha Liu, 2014. "Textual sentiment in finance: A survey of methods and models," Open Access publications 10197/8213, Research Repository, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:rru:oapubs:10197/8213
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/8213
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Behavioral finance; Textual sentiment; Internet messages; News; Market efficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • G02 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Behavioral Finance: Underlying Principles
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G30 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - General
    • G34 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Mergers; Acquisitions; Restructuring; Corporate Governance
    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • M41 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Accounting - - - Accounting

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