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Public R&D Subsidies, Outside Private Support, and Employment Growth

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  • Link, Albert N.

    () (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics)

  • Scott, John T.

    () (Dartmouth College)

Abstract

In the aftermath of the passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the employment effects of public subsidies have been scrutinized because of new emphasis on public accountability and transparency. In this paper we investigate conditions in which public subsidies of research and development (R&D) in small firms stimulate employment growth. We find, based on an empirical analysis of employment growth induced by U.S. Department of Defense Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program awards, that the stimulated employment growth is greater under two conditions: one, the presence of outside investors providing additional funding for the R&D, and two, when an exceptional amount of intellectual property is created by the publicly subsidized R&D. In addition to outside investors, other firms that make commercial agreements with the subsidized firm appear important for the employment growth of the subsidized firm. Cooperation between the small business doing the R&D and other firms is an important determinant of the commercial success of the technologies created with the support of public funds.

Suggested Citation

  • Link, Albert N. & Scott, John T., 2013. "Public R&D Subsidies, Outside Private Support, and Employment Growth," UNCG Economics Working Papers 13-1, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:uncgec:2013_001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Governments as entrepreneur: Evaluating the commercialization success of SBIR projects," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 2, pages 25-38 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "The exploitation of publicly funded technology," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 8, pages 127-135 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. José Ángel Zúñiga-Vicente & César Alonso-Borrego & Francisco J. Forcadell & José I. Galán, 2014. "Assessing The Effect Of Public Subsidies On Firm R&D Investment: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(1), pages 36-67, February.
    4. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Employment growth from public support of innovation in small firms," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 3, pages 41-64 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Employment growth from the Small Business Innovation Research program," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 4, pages 65-88 Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:oup:indcch:v:25:y:2016:i:6:p:955-975. is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hall, Michael & Link, Albert, 2015. "Technology-Based Growth Policies: The Case of North Carolina’s Green Business Fund," UNCG Economics Working Papers 15-1, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    3. Dentoni, Domenico & English, Francis & Schwarz, Daniela, 2014. "The Impact of Public R&D on Marketing and Supply Chains on Small Farms’ Market Sensing Capability: Evidence from the Australian Seafood Industry," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 17(1).
    4. Link, Albert & Scott, John, 2018. "Propensity to Patent and Firm Size for Small R&D-Intensive Firms," UNCG Economics Working Papers 18-1, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    5. Bronzini, Raffaello & Piselli, Paolo, 2016. "The impact of R&D subsidies on firm innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 442-457.
    6. Anna Kochenkova & Rosa Grimaldi & Federico Munari, 2016. "Public policy measures in support of knowledge transfer activities: a review of academic literature," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 407-429, June.
    7. Scott, John T. & Scott, Troy J., 2016. "The entrepreneur's idea and outside finance: Theory and evidence about entrepreneurial roles," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 118-130.
    8. Sergio Afcha & Jose García-Quevedo, 2016. "The impact of R&D subsidies on R&D employment composition," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(6), pages 955-975.
    9. Francesco Aiello & Giuseppe Albanese & Paolo Piselli, 2017. "Public R&D Support In Italy. Evidence From A New Firm-Level Patent Data Set," Working Papers 201702, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public subsidy of R&D; Intellectual property; Employment growth; Entrepreneurship; Cooperation;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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