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The Fountain of Knowledge: An Epistemological Perspective on the Growth of U.S. SBIR-Funded Firms

Author

Listed:
  • Audretsch, David

    (Indiana University)

  • Link, Albert

    (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics)

Abstract

The premise of this paper is that a basis for firms receiving Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) research awards to develop commercializable technologies is not only their proposed creative ideas but also their endowment of attendant knowledge necessary to develop the technology being proposed. Based on this premise, we propose that those firms that have higher growth rates attributable to their SBIR awards are also those firms that are more creative and have more knowledge endowments. Empirically, we quantify a firm's creativity and its sources of research knowledge in terms of its past experiences, and we find that firms with more technical experience and sector experience are those that have realized higher growth rates from their SBIR-funded research.

Suggested Citation

  • Audretsch, David & Link, Albert, 2019. "The Fountain of Knowledge: An Epistemological Perspective on the Growth of U.S. SBIR-Funded Firms," UNCG Economics Working Papers 19-9, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:uncgec:2019_009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Governments as entrepreneur: Evaluating the commercialization success of SBIR projects," Chapters, in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 2, pages 25-38, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "The exploitation of publicly funded technology," Chapters, in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 8, pages 127-135, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Albert N. Link & Martijn Hasselt, 2020. "Exploring the impact of R&D on patenting activity in small women-owned and minority-owned entrepreneurial firms," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 54(4), pages 1061-1066, April.
    4. Winter, Sidney G., 1984. "Schumpeterian competition in alternative technological regimes," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 5(3-4), pages 287-320.
    5. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Employment growth from public support of innovation in small firms," Chapters, in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 3, pages 41-64, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-846, September.
    7. Albert N Link & John T Scott, 2018. "Toward an assessment of the US Small Business Innovation Research Program at the National Institutes of Health," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 45(1), pages 83-91.
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    Cited by:

    1. Albert N. Link & Martijn Hasselt & Silvio Vismara, 2021. "Going public with public money," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 57(3), pages 1419-1426, October.
    2. Feng-Jyh Lin & ChihuFeng Lai, 2021. "Key factors affecting technological capabilities in small and medium-sized Enterprises in Taiwan," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 131-143, March.
    3. André Cherubini Alves & Bruno Brandão Fischer & Nicholas S. Vonortas, 2021. "Ecosystems of entrepreneurship: configurations and critical dimensions," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 67(1), pages 73-106, August.
    4. Vera Butkouskaya & Francesc Romagosa & Maria Noguera, 2020. "Obstacles to Sustainable Entrepreneurship amongst Tourism Students: A Gender Comparison," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(5), pages 1-15, February.
    5. David Bruce Audretsch & Maksim Belitski & Rosa Caiazza, 2021. "Start-ups, Innovation and Knowledge Spillovers," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 46(6), pages 1995-2016, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    knowledge; creativity; entrepreneurship; SBIR program; technology;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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