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The Exploitation of Publicly Funded Technology

Author

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  • Link, Albert N.

    () (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics)

  • Scott, John T.

    () (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics)

Abstract

In this paper we focus on technology that resulted from R&D projects funded by U.S. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II awards. We ask: Is there evidence that strategic commercial agreements allow foreign firms to exploit the technologies developed through the SBIR program and funded by U.S. taxpayers? Based on descriptive information from Phase II SBIR-funded project data collected by the National Research Council within the National Academies, we conclude that SBIR funds for Phase II projects and the technologies associated with those projects are not, to a pronounced extent, benefiting foreign firms through agreements with SBIR firms or investors. In that sense, there is no evidence that the technologies developed with funds from U.S. taxpayers are, to any significant extent, being exploited by foreign firms through commercial agreements with SBIR firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Link, Albert N. & Scott, John T., 2012. "The Exploitation of Publicly Funded Technology," UNCG Economics Working Papers 12-5, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:uncgec:2012_005
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Governments as entrepreneur: Evaluating the commercialization success of SBIR projects," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 2, pages 25-38 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Private Investor Participation and Commercialization Rates for Government-sponsored Research and Development: Would a Prediction Market Improve the Performance of the SBIR Programme?," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 11, pages 157-174 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Employment growth from public support of innovation in small firms," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 3, pages 41-64 Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. James Cunningham & Paul O’Reilly & Conor O’Kane & Vincent Mangematin, 2014. "The inhibiting factors that principal investigators experience in leading publicly funded research," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 93-110, February.
    2. Albert N. Link & Christopher J. Ruhm & Donald S. Siegel, 2014. "Private Equity and the Innovation Strategies of Entrepreneurial Firms: Empirical Evidence from the Small Business Innovation Research Program," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(2), pages 103-113, March.
    3. repec:hal:gemwpa:hal-00756228 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Public R&D subsidies, outside private support, and employment growth," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(6), pages 537-550, September.
    5. David Audretsch & Erik Lehmann & Mike Wright, 2014. "Technology transfer in a global economy," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 301-312, June.
    6. James Cunningham & Paul O'Reilly & Conor O'Kane & Vincent Mangematin, 2014. "The inhibiting factors that principal investigators experience in leading publicly funded research projects," Grenoble Ecole de Management (Post-Print) hal-00756228, HAL.
    7. repec:hal:wpaper:hal-00756228 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Technology; Small Entrepreneurial Firms; SBIR Program; Strategic Agreements;

    JEL classification:

    • L24 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Contracting Out; Joint Ventures
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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