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Financing Channel and Monetary Policy: Evidence from Islamic Banking in Indonesia

Author

Listed:
  • Zulkhibri, Muhamed

    () (The Islamic Research and Teaching Institute (IRTI))

  • Sukmana, Raditya

    (The Islamic Research and Teaching Institute (IRTI))

Abstract

Using Indonesia Islamic banks data from 2003 to 2014, this paper employs panel regression methodology by investigating the responses of Islamic banks to changes in financing rate and monetary policy may differ, depending on their characteristics. The results suggest that the financing rate has negative impact on Islamic bank financing, while bank-specific characteristics have positive influence on Islamic bank financing. The degree of size and capital have greater impact than liquidity on Islamic bank financing. On the other hand, changes in monetary policy is insignificant on bank financing, which implies that the transmission of monetary policy through the Islamic segment of the banking sector is weak. Furthermore, the weak impact of monetary policy on bank financing can be explained by the dramatic expansion of Islamic banks during this sample period, which contributed to substantial increase in deposit growth and high liquidity position.

Suggested Citation

  • Zulkhibri, Muhamed & Sukmana, Raditya, 2016. "Financing Channel and Monetary Policy: Evidence from Islamic Banking in Indonesia," Working Papers 2016-1, The Islamic Research and Teaching Institute (IRTI).
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:irtiwp:2016_001
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Raditya Sukmana & Muhammad Kholid, 2013. "An assessment of liquidity policies with respect to Islamic and conventional banks: A case study of Indonesia," Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 5(2), pages 126-138, August.
    2. Serhan Cevik & Joshua Charap, 2015. "The Behavior of Conventional and Islamic Bank Deposit Returns in Malaysia and Turkey," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(1), pages 111-124.
    3. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    4. Gambacorta, Leonardo, 2005. "Inside the bank lending channel," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(7), pages 1737-1759, October.
    5. Kishan, Ruby P. & Opiela, Timothy P., 2006. "Bank capital and loan asymmetry in the transmission of monetary policy," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 259-285, January.
    6. Aysun, Uluc & Hepp, Ralf, 2013. "Identifying the balance sheet and the lending channels of monetary transmission: A loan-level analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 2812-2822.
    7. Amir Kia & Ali F. Darrat, 2003. "Modeling Money Demand under the Profit-Sharing Banking Scheme: Evidence on Policy Invariance and Long-Run Stability," Carleton Economic Papers 03-13, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2007.
    8. Jeremy C. Stein & Anil K. Kashyap, 2000. "What Do a Million Observations on Banks Say about the Transmission of Monetary Policy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 407-428, June.
    9. Luca Errico & Mitra Farahbaksh, 1998. "Islamic Banking; Issues in Prudential Regulations and Supervision," IMF Working Papers 98/30, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Kia, Amir & Darrat, Ali F., 2007. "Modeling money demand under the profit-sharing banking scheme: Some evidence on policy invariance and long-run stability," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 104-123.
    11. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark, 1989. "Agency Costs, Net Worth, and Business Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 14-31, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Islamic Banks; Financing Rate; Financing Channels; Monetary Policy; Panel Regression;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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