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Aging, Labor Turnover and Firm Performance

Author

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  • Ilmakunnas, Pekka
  • Maliranta, Mika

Abstract

We study whether older workers are costly to firms. Our estimation equations are derived from a variant of the decomposition methods frequently used for measuring micro-level sources of industry productivity growth. By using comprehensive linked employer-employee data from the Finnish business sector, we study the productivity and wage effects, and hence the profitability effects, of hiring and separation of younger and older workers. The evidence shows that separations of older workers are profitable to firms, especially in the manufacturing ICT-industries. Robustness checks include the use of regional labor supply and other variables as instruments for the potential endogeneity of the labor flows.

Suggested Citation

  • Ilmakunnas, Pekka & Maliranta, Mika, 2007. "Aging, Labor Turnover and Firm Performance," Discussion Papers 1092, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  • Handle: RePEc:rif:dpaper:1092
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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Ours, 2009. "Will You Still Need Me: When I’m 64?," De Economist, Springer, vol. 157(4), pages 441-460, December.
    2. Mahlberg, Bernhard & Freund, Inga & Crespo Cuaresma, Jesús & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2013. "Ageing, productivity and wages in Austria," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 5-15.
    3. Schimke, Antje, 2014. "Aging workforce and firm growth in the context of "extreme" employment growth events," Working Paper Series in Economics 54, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Business Engineering.
    4. Mika Maliranta & Pierre Mohnen & Petri Rouvinen, 2009. "Is inter-firm labor mobility a channel of knowledge spillovers? Evidence from a linked employer--employee panel," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(6), pages 1161-1191, December.
    5. Jan C. van Ours & Lenny Stoeldraijer, 2010. "Age, Wage and Productivity," CESifo Working Paper Series 2965, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Weiss, Matthias, 2016. "Productivity and age: Evidence from work teams at the assembly line," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 30-42.
    7. Mika Maliranta & Satu Nurmi & Hanna Virtanen, 2010. "Resources in vocational education and post-schooling outcomes," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(5), pages 520-544, August.
    8. Mika Maliranta & Satu Nurmi & Hanna Virtanen, 2008. "It takes three to tango in employment: Matching vocational education organisations, students and companies in labour market," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0022, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    9. Stoeldraijer, Lenny & van Ours, Jan C, 2010. "Age, wage and productivity," CEPR Discussion Papers 7713, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Katharina Frosch, 2009. "Do only new brooms sweep clean? A review on workforce age and innovation," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-005, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    11. Frosch, Katharina & Göbel, Christian & Zwick, Thomas, 2011. "Separating wheat and chaff: age-specific staffing strategies and innovative performance at the firm level
      [Den Weizen von der Spreu trennen: Altersbezogene Personalpolitik und Innovationen auf der
      ," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-047, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    12. Schimke, Antje, 2012. "Entrepreneurial aging and employment growth in the context of extreme growth events," Working Paper Series in Economics 39, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Business Engineering.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    aging; productivity; wage; profits; hiring; separation; employer-employee data;

    JEL classification:

    • C43 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Index Numbers and Aggregation
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions

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