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Is There a Link between Common Property Forest Management and Private Tree Growing? Evidence of Behavioral Effects from Highland Ethiopia

  • Mekonnen, Alemu
  • Bluffstone, Ramdall

This paper attempts to analyze the correlates of (1) aggregated and disaggregated indices of common property forest management (CPFM) as perceived by households, and (2) the decision to grow trees and the number of trees grown with the objective of looking at the effect of CPFM. We used data collected in 2007 from a sample of rural households in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. While the CPFM indices we used varied across households, the overall CPFM index and its two sub-indices (management tools and institutional characteristics) showed a generally low level of management. We observed significant differences in the nature of management of community forests across sites, mainly driven by population size, population density, and size of forests. The results also showed that the overall management of community forests, as reflected by the overall CPFM index and its two sub-indices, had a positive association with the decision to grow trees on-farm as well as the number of trees grown. These results suggest that households that perceive a more strict management are more likely to grow trees on their farm and that those which do grow trees grow more trees. A strong correlation between the different CPFM indices suggests that households perceived the components of CPFM as being similar and hence these components were, in this case, indistinguishable.

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Paper provided by Resources For the Future in its series Discussion Papers with number dp-08-29-efd.

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Date of creation: 15 Oct 2008
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Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-08-29-efd
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  1. Edmonds, Eric V., 2002. "Government-initiated community resource management and local resource extraction from Nepal's forests," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 89-115, June.
  2. Bluffstone, Randall & Yesuf, Mahmud & Bushie, Bilisuma & Damite, Demessie, 2008. "Rural Livelihoods, Poverty, and the Millennium Development Goals: Evidence from Ethiopian Survey Data," Discussion Papers dp-08-07-efd, Resources For the Future.
  3. Sethi, Rajiv & Somanathan, E, 1996. "The Evolution of Social Norms in Common Property Resource Use," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 766-88, September.
  4. Martin Linde-Rahr, 2003. "Property Rights and Deforestation: The Choice of Fuelwood Source in Rural Viet Nam," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(2), pages 217-234.
  5. Richard L. Hegan & Grant Hauer & Martin K. Luckert, 2003. "Is the Tragedy of the Commons Likely? Factors Preventing the Dissipation of Fuelwood Rents in Zimbabwe," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(2), pages 181-197.
  6. Alemu Mekonnen, 2009. "Tenure Security, Resource Endowments, and Tree Growing: Evidence from the Amhara Region of Ethiopia," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 85(2), pages 292-307.
  7. Heltberg, Rasmus, 2001. "Determinants and impact of local institutions for common resource management," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(02), pages 183-208, May.
  8. Bluffstone, Randall & Boscolo, Marco & Molina, Ramiro, 2008. "Does better common property forest management promote behavioral change? On-farm tree planting in the Bolivian Andes," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(02), pages 137-170, April.
  9. Mani Nepal & Alok K. Bohara & Robert P. Berrens, 2007. "The Impacts of Social Networks and Household Forest Conservation Efforts in Rural Nepal," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(2), pages 174-191.
  10. Dayton-Johnson, Jeff, 2000. "Choosing rules to govern the commons: a model with evidence from Mexico," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 19-41, May.
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