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Does better common property forest management promote behavioral change? On-farm tree planting in the Bolivian Andes1

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  • BLUFFSTONE, RANDALL
  • BOSCOLO, MARCO
  • MOLINA, RAMIRO

Abstract

This paper analyzes behavioral change spurred by better common property forest management (CPFM), with a focus on on-farm tree planting. Results from our theoretical household model suggest that on-farm trees, which provide products that can substitute for those from common forests, should be stimulated by better CPFM systems. We test this finding using data from a household survey conducted in the Bolivian Andes in 2000. We find that better CPFM at its highest level of aggregation is positively correlated with more and higher quality on-farm trees. In terms of less aggregated indices, relatively few variables are significant, though two particularly important aspects of forest property rights – access clarity and the existence of formal penalties for overuse – actually reduce on-farm tree planting. We therefore conclude that in general synergies between individual CPFM components are most critical for behavioral change, but improvement of property rights aspects of CPFM may give counter-intuitive results.

Suggested Citation

  • Bluffstone, Randall & Boscolo, Marco & Molina, Ramiro, 2008. "Does better common property forest management promote behavioral change? On-farm tree planting in the Bolivian Andes1," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(2), pages 137-170, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:13:y:2008:i:02:p:137-170_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Dambala Gelo & Steven F. Koch & Edwin Muchapondwah, 2013. "Do the Poor Benefit from Devolution Policies? Evidences from Quantile Treatment Effect Evaluation of Joint Forest Management," Working Papers 201388, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    2. Bluffstone, Randy, 2014. "Child Labor, the Wealth Paradox, and Common Forest Management in Bolivia," Discussion Papers edf-dp-14-16, Resources For the Future.
    3. Gebreegziabher, Zenebe & van Kooten, G. Cornelis, 2013. "Does community and household tree planting imply increased use of wood for fuel? Evidence from Ethiopia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 30-40.
    4. Mekonnen, Alemu & Damte, Abebe, 2011. "Private Trees as Household Assets and Determinants of Tree-Growing Behavior in Rural Ethiopia," Discussion Papers dp-11-14-efd, Resources For the Future.
    5. Beyene, Abebe D. & Bluffstone, Randall & Mekonnen, Alemu, 2013. "Community Controlled Forests, Carbon Sequestration and REDD+: Some Evidence from Ethiopia," Discussion Papers dp-13-07-efd, Resources For the Future.
    6. Bluffstone, Randy & Robinson, Elizabeth & Guthiga, Paul, 2012. "Deforestation and forest degradation are estimated to account for between 12 percent and 20 percent of annual greenhouse gas emissions. These activities, largely in the developing world, released abou," Discussion Papers dp-12-11-efd, Resources For the Future.
    7. Alemu Mekonnen & Randall Bluffstone, 2017. "Does Community Forest Collective Action Promote Private Tree Planting? Evidence from Ethiopia," International Business Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 10(5), pages 86-106, May.
    8. Gelo, Dambala & Koch, Steven F., 2014. "The Impact of Common Property Right Forestry: Evidence from Ethiopian Villages," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 395-406.
    9. Dambala Gelo & Steven F. Koch, 2012. "Welfare and Common Property Rights Forestry: Evidence from Ethiopian Villages," Working Papers 277, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    10. Gelo, Dambala & Dikgang, Johane, 2019. "Collective action and heterogeneous welfare effects: Evidence from Ethiopian villages," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 16(C).
    11. Gelo, Dambala & Koch, Steven F., 2015. "Contingent valuation of community forestry programs in Ethiopia: Controlling for preference anomalies in double-bounded CVM," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 79-89.
    12. Dambala Gelo & Steven F. Koch, 2011. "The Welfare Effect of Common Property Forestry Rights:Evidence from Ethiopian Villages," Working Papers 201123, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    13. Bluffstone, Randy & Robinson, Elizabeth & Guthiga, Paul, 2013. "REDD+and community-controlled forests in low-income countries: Any hope for a linkage?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 43-52.
    14. Gelo, Dambala & Muchapondwa, Edwin & Koch, Steven F., 2016. "Decentralization, market integration and efficiency-equity trade-offs: Evidence from Joint Forest Management in Ethiopian villages," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 1-23.
    15. Beyene, Abebe D. & Koch, Steven F., 2013. "Property rights, institutions and choice of fuelwood source in rural Ethiopia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 30-38.
    16. Bluffstone, Randy & Dannenberg, Astrid & Martinsson, Peter & Jha, Prakash & Bista, Rajesh, 2020. "Cooperative behavior and common pool resources: Experimental evidence from community forest user groups in Nepal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).
    17. Yusuph J. Kulindwa, 2016. "Key factors that influence households’ tree planting behaviour," Natural Resources Forum, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(1-2), pages 37-50, February.
    18. Mekonnen, Alemu & Bluffstone, Ramdall, 2008. "Is There a Link between Common Property Forest Management and Private Tree Growing? Evidence of Behavioral Effects from Highland Ethiopia," Discussion Papers dp-08-29-efd, Resources For the Future.

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