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Who Cares? Modelling the Care Drain

Author

Listed:
  • Marina Della Giusta

    () (Department of Economics, University of Reading)

  • Nigar Hashimzade

    () (Department of Economics, University of Reading)

Abstract

We discuss the effects of the care drain on human capital accumulation in developing countries, a potentially important downside of the phenomenon that has not been yet formally investigated: whilst recent literature on the brain drain suggests that it may not hamper human capital formation in developing countries, this may not be true with the care drain. We also discuss the effects of pressure for low-cost care in developed countries, pointing to the possibility of scenarios in which children's wellbeing and human capital accumulation are hampered in both developed and developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Marina Della Giusta & Nigar Hashimzade, 2012. "Who Cares? Modelling the Care Drain," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2012-04, Henley Business School, Reading University.
  • Handle: RePEc:rdg:emxxdp:em-dp2012-04
    as

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    File URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/economics/emdp2012097.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    2. Susan Himmelweit, 2007. "The prospects for caring: economic theory and policy analysis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(4), pages 581-599, July.
    3. Alessandra Casarico & Alessandro Sommacal, 2008. "Labor Income Taxation, Human Capital and Growth: The Role of Child Care," CESifo Working Paper Series 2363, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Nancy Folbre & Julie A. Nelson, 2000. "For Love or Money--Or Both?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 123-140, Fall.
    5. Sanjiv Gupta & Michael Ash, 2008. "Whose money, whose time? A nonparametric approach to modeling time spent on housework in the United States," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 93-120.
    6. Joni Hersch, 2009. "Home production and wages: evidence from the American Time Use Survey," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 159-178, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    human capital; care; migration; wellbeing;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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