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Inflation Targeting and the Inflation Process: Some Lessons from an Open Economy

Author

Listed:
  • Guy Debelle

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

  • Jenny Wilkinson

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

Abstract

In an open economy inflation-targeting framework, whether policy-makers should target aggregate or non-traded inflation depends on the structural relationships in the economy. This paper shows that in a small empirical model of the Australian economy, it makes little difference which measure is targeted. This conclusion is reinforced by the significant changes to the inflation process that the paper suggests have occurred over the past two decades: the effect of exchange rate changes on inflation appears to have become more muted and the inflation process appears to have become better anchored.

Suggested Citation

  • Guy Debelle & Jenny Wilkinson, 2002. "Inflation Targeting and the Inflation Process: Some Lessons from an Open Economy," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2002-01, Reserve Bank of Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:rba:rbardp:rdp2002-01
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    File URL: http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2002/pdf/rdp2002-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chris Ryan & Christopher Thompson, 2000. "Inflation Targeting and Exchange Rate Fluctuations in Australia," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2000-06, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    2. Jacqueline Dwyer & Kenneth Leong, 2001. "Changes in the Determinants of Inflation in Australia," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2001-02, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    3. Taylor, John B., 2000. "Low inflation, pass-through, and the pricing power of firms," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(7), pages 1389-1408, June.
    4. Laurence Ball, 2002. "Policy Rules and External Shocks," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Norman Loayza & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Series (ed.), Monetary Policy: Rules and Transmission Mechanisms, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 3, pages 047-064 Central Bank of Chile.
    5. Svensson, Lars E. O., 2000. "Open-economy inflation targeting," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 155-183, February.
    6. Jacqueline Dwyer & Kenneth Leong, 2001. "Changes in the determinants of inflation in Australia," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Empirical studies of structural changes and inflation, volume 3, pages 1-28 Bank for International Settlements.
    7. Dwyer, Jacqueline & Kent, Christopher & Pease, Andrew, 1994. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through: Testing the Small Country Assumption for Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 70(211), pages 408-423, December.
    8. David Gruen, 2000. "Introduction to The Australian Economy in the 1990s," RBA Annual Conference Volume,in: David Gruen & Sona Shrestha (ed.), The Australian Economy in the 1990s Reserve Bank of Australia.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Papa M N'Diaye & Douglas Laxton, 2002. "Monetary Policy Credibility and the Unemployment-Inflation Tradeoff; Some Evidence From 17 Industrial Countries," IMF Working Papers 02/220, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Girijasankar Mallik & Anis Chowdhury, 2011. "Effect of inflation uncertainty, output uncertainty and oil price on inflation and growth in Australia," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(4), pages 414-429, September.
    3. Castelnuovo, Efrem, 2008. "Regime shifts and the stability of backward-looking Phillips curves in open economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 40-53, February.
    4. Amit Kara & Edward Nelson, 2003. "The Exchange Rate and Inflation in the UK," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 50(5), pages 585-608, November.
    5. Marcela Meirelles Aurelio, 2005. "Do we really know how inflation targeters set interest rates?," Research Working Paper RWP 05-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    6. Juthathip Jongwanich, 2006. "Exchange Rate Regimes, Capital Account Opening and Real Exchange Rates: Evidence from Thailand," Departmental Working Papers 2006-01, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    7. Diego Moccero & Shingo Watanabe & Boris Cournède, 2011. "What Drives Inflation in the Major OECD Economies?," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 854, OECD Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    exchange rates; inflation targeting; monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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