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Do Terrorist Attacks Affect Ethnic Discrimination in the Labour Market? Evidence from Two Randomised Field Experiments

Author

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  • Gunn Elisabeth Birkelund

    (Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo)

  • Elisabeth Ugreninov

    (Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo)

  • Tak Wing Chan

    () (Department of Social Science, UCL Institute of Education)

  • Arnfinn Midtbøen

    (Institute for Social Research, Oslo)

  • Jon Rogstad

    (Institute for Labour and Social Research, Oslo)

Abstract

Terrorist attacks are known to influence public opinion. But do they also change behaviour? We address this question by comparing the results of two identical randomised field experiments on ethnic discrimination in hiring that we conducted in Oslo. The first experiment was conducted before the 2011 terrorist attacks in Norway; the second experiment was conducted after the attacks. In both experiments, applicants with a typical Pakistani name were significantly less likely to get a job interview compared to those with a typical Norwegian name. But the ethnic gap in call-back rates were very similar in the two experiments. Thus, Pakistanis in Norway still experienced the same level of discrimination, despite claims that Norwegians have become more positive about migrants after the terrorist attacks.

Suggested Citation

  • Gunn Elisabeth Birkelund & Elisabeth Ugreninov & Tak Wing Chan & Arnfinn Midtbøen & Jon Rogstad, 2017. "Do Terrorist Attacks Affect Ethnic Discrimination in the Labour Market? Evidence from Two Randomised Field Experiments," DoQSS Working Papers 17-02, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1702
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sides, John & Citrin, Jack, 2007. "European Opinion About Immigration: The Role of Identities, Interests and Information," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 37(03), pages 477-504, July.
    2. David Neumark, 2012. "Detecting Discrimination in Audit and Correspondence Studies," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(4), pages 1128-1157.
    3. Simone Schüller, 2016. "The Effects of 9/11 on Attitudes toward Immigration and the Moderating Role of Education," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(4), pages 604-632, November.
    4. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
    5. repec:cup:apsrev:v:104:y:2010:i:01:p:40-60_99 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. James J. Heckman, 1998. "Detecting Discrimination," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 101-116, Spring.
    7. Olof Åslund & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2005. "Shifts in attitudes and labor market discrimination: Swedish experiences after 9-11," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 603-629, November.
    8. Joseph Rodgers & Craig John & Ronnie Coleman, 2005. "Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(4), pages 675-692, November.
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    Keywords

    Terrorist attack; Randomised field experiment; Ethnic discrimination;

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