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Changes in the relationship between social housing tenure and child outcomes over time: Comparing the Millennium and British Cohort Studies

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  • Bilal Nasim

    () (Department of Quantitative Social Science, Institute of Education, University College London)

Abstract

This paper is the first to investigate how tenure inequalities in child outcomes have changed over time. I compare the differences in the cognitive, non-cognitive and health outcomes of children in social housing with children in non-social housing, and evaluate whether these tenure differences have changed between the 1970 BCS cohort and the 2000 MCS cohort. I find that in both cohorts, children in social housing exhibit worse outcomes across all three dimensions than children in non-social housing. For cognitive and health outcomes, however, the tenure difference has narrowed between the two cohorts, while for non-cognitive outcomes, the tenure difference has widened. These results suggest that children in social housing tenure have experienced both a relative improvement in their cognitive and health outcomes over time, and a relative worsening in their non-cognitive outcomes over time, compared with children in non-social housing.

Suggested Citation

  • Bilal Nasim, 2015. "Changes in the relationship between social housing tenure and child outcomes over time: Comparing the Millennium and British Cohort Studies," DoQSS Working Papers 15-06, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1506
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James P. Smith, 2009. "The Impact of Childhood Health on Adult Labor Market Outcomes," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(3), pages 478-489, August.
    2. Jenkins, Andrew & Kneale, Dylan & Lupton, Ruth & Tunstall, Rebecca, 2011. "Growing up in social housing in the new millennium: housing, neighbourhoods, and early outcomes for children born in 2000," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 43867, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    4. Flavio Cunha & James J. Heckman & Susanne M. Schennach, 2010. "Estimating the Technology of Cognitive and Noncognitive Skill Formation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(3), pages 883-931, May.
    5. Ben Jann, 2008. "The Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition for linear regression models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 8(4), pages 453-479, December.
    6. Pedro Carneiro & Claire Crawford & Alissa Goodman, 2007. "The Impact of Early Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills on Later Outcomes," CEE Discussion Papers 0092, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    7. Case, Anne & Fertig, Angela & Paxson, Christina, 2005. "The lasting impact of childhood health and circumstance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 365-389, March.
    8. Brunello, Giorgio & Schlotter, Martin, 2011. "Non Cognitive Skills and Personality Traits: Labour Market Relevance and their Development in Education & Training Systems," IZA Discussion Papers 5743, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Housing Tenure; Child Outcomes; Cohort Studies;

    JEL classification:

    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty

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