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Research Funding of Australian Universities: Are There Increasing Concentration?

Australia’s higher education sector is facing a watershed moment of its research funding regime. The Federal Government has proposed to change from the long-standing funding model that heavily based on publication output, to one based on publication plus industry engagement. In this paper, we take stock of how research funding is raised and allocated within the sector over the past two decades. It is found that the share of total research funding by university groups have barely changed. But the discipline of Biological and Clinical Sciences has increasingly dominated competitive funding schemes..

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File URL: http://www.uq.edu.au/economics/abstract/578.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia in its series Discussion Papers Series with number 578.

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Date of creation: 17 Jan 2017
Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:578
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  1. Ross Williams, 2016. "Evaluating the Contribution of Higher Education to Australia's Research Performance," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(2), pages 174-183, 02.
  2. Simon Ville & Abbas Valadkhani & Martin O'Brien, 2006. "The Distribution Of Research Performance Across Australian Universities, 1992-2003, And Its Implications For 'Building Diversity'," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 343-361, December.
  3. Simon Marginson, 2001. "Trends in the Funding of Australian Higher Education," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(2), pages 205-215.
  4. Abbott, M. & Doucouliagos, C., 2003. "The efficiency of Australian universities: a data envelopment analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 89-97, February.
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