IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Environmentalising Economic Development: a South East Asian Perspective



South Asia's pursuit of economic development has entailed considerable damage to and exposed the fragility of the physical environment of the region like elsewhere in the developing world. South Asia is beset with a number of environmental problems. This paper provides an analytical overview of the of the environmental problems that manifest themselves in South Asia in a comparative perspective with East and Southeast Asian countries as well as selected developed market economies. It is argued that to-date, South Asian development process has been environment-intensive and that environmental problems may set serious constraints to sustain growth in production to feed its growing population. The paper underscores the need for environmentalesque-type process innovation to reverse the trend of high environment-intensity in South Asian development.

Suggested Citation

  • Dr. Mohammad Alauddin, 2002. "Environmentalising Economic Development: a South East Asian Perspective," Discussion Papers Series 299, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:299

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Clement A. Tisdell, 2014. "Sustainable agriculture," Chapters,in: Handbook of Sustainable Development, chapter 32, pages 517-531 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Lele, Sharachchandra M., 1991. "Sustainable development: A critical review," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 607-621, June.
    3. Clement A. Tisdell, 1995. "Asian Development And Environmental Dilemmas," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 13(1), pages 38-49, January.
    4. Lopez Ramon, 1994. "The Environment as a Factor of Production: The Effects of Economic Growth and Trade Liberalization," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 163-184, September.
    5. Blackorby, Charles & Donaldson, David, 1992. "Pigs and Guinea Pigs: A Note on the Ethics of Animal Exploitation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(415), pages 1345-1369, November.
    6. Ng, Yew-Kwang, 1986. "Social criteria for evaluating population change: An alternative to the Blackorby-Donaldson criterion," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 375-381, April.
    7. Tisdell, Clement A., 2010. "Conservation Value," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 90879, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:299. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (SOE IT). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.