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Does Colonialism Exert a Long Term Economic Impact on Adult Literacy?

  • Arusha Cooray (University of Wollongong)

Examining the reason for differences in adult literacy rates across countries, this study finds that colonialism exerts a long term negative economic impact on literacy rates of the colonised. Investigating in particular, the effects of the French and British colonisation policies, the results of this study indicate that the colonial legacy remained long after independence, slowing down improvements in literacy rates in the former colonies. In conclusion it is noted that the implementation of policies that will ensure equal access to education for all is important.

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File URL: http://www3.qeh.ox.ac.uk/RePEc/qeh/qehwps/qehwps176.pdf
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Paper provided by Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford in its series QEH Working Papers with number qehwps176.

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Handle: RePEc:qeh:qehwps:qehwps176
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  1. Bertocchi, Graziella & Canova, Fabio, 2002. "Did colonization matter for growth?: An empirical exploration into the historical causes of Africa's underdevelopment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1851-1871, December.
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  8. Sundaram, Aparna & Vanneman, Reeve, 2008. "Gender Differentials in Literacy in India: The Intriguing Relationship with Women's Labor Force Participation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 128-143, January.
  9. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2000. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 7771, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Daniel Ortega & Francisco Rodríguez, 2008. "Freed from Illiteracy? A Closer Look at Venezuela's Misión Robinson Literacy Campaign," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(1), pages 1-30, October.
  11. Stanley L. Engerman & Kenneth L. Sokoloff, 2005. "Colonialism, Inequality, and Long-Run Paths of Development," NBER Working Papers 11057, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Brian Maddox, 2008. "What Good is Literacy? Insights and Implications of the Capabilities Approach," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 185-206.
  13. Chaudhary, Latika, 2007. "Essays on Education and Social Divisions in Colonial India," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 67(02), pages 500-503, June.
  14. J. A. Hausman, 1976. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Working papers 185, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  15. Duol Kim & Ki-Joo Park, 2008. "Colonialism And Industrialisation: Factory Labour Productivity Of Colonial Korea, 1913-37," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 48(1), pages 26-46, 03.
  16. Grier, Robin M, 1999. " Colonial Legacies and Economic Growth," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 98(3-4), pages 317-35, March.
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