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Impact of Lower Rated Journals on Economists’ Judgments of Publication Lists: Evidence from a Survey Experiment

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  • Nattavudh Powdthavee
  • Yohanes E. Riyanto
  • Jack L. Knetsch

Abstract

Publications in leading journals are widely known to have a positive impact on economists’ judgments of the value of authors’ contributions to the literature and on their professional reputations. Very little attention has been given, however, to the impacts of the addition of publications in lower rated journals on such judgments. In our main tests, we asked sub-samples of economist in 44 universities throughout the world to rate either a publication list with only higher rated journals or a list with all of these but with additional publications in nearly as many respected but lower rated journals. Our primary finding was that the inclusion of lower rated journals had a statistically significant negative impact on these economists’ judgments of the value of the author’s contribution. To the extent that such judgments may influence research and publication strategies our findings imply negative implications on social welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Nattavudh Powdthavee & Yohanes E. Riyanto & Jack L. Knetsch, 2017. "Impact of Lower Rated Journals on Economists’ Judgments of Publication Lists: Evidence from a Survey Experiment," PIER Discussion Papers 63, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:pui:dpaper:63
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Simon Ek & Magnus Henrekson, 2019. "The Geography and Concentration of Authorship in the Top Five: Implications For European Economics," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 66(2), pages 215-245, May.
    2. Corsi, Marcella & D’Ippoliti, Carlo & Zacchia, Giulia, 2019. "Diversity of backgrounds and ideas: The case of research evaluation in economics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(9), pages 1-1.
    3. Timothy Perri, 2018. "Economics of evaluation (with special reference to promotion and tenure committees)," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 1-19, February.
    4. David I. Stern & Richard S.J. Tol, 2018. "How to Count Citations If You Must: Comment," Working Paper Series 0118, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Lower Ranked Journals; Publication; Judgment Bias; Less-is-better Effect; Resume;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics

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