IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pre/wpaper/200713.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Zimbabwe’s Black Market for Foreign Exchange

Author

Listed:
  • Albert Makochekanwa

    () (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

Abstract

This paper looks into the changes of the black market premium for foreign exchange in Zimbabwe. Generally, the black market for foreign exchange arises as a direct consequence of the adoption of exchange rate controls in many developing economies facing substantial macroeconomic imbalances. Despite its negative impact on Zimbabwe’s economy, this market has not, so far, attracted the attention of researchers. The research attempts to describe the functioning of the black market and find out the determinants of the parallel premium based on a stock-flow model as well as to investigate whether inflation Granger causes the parallel exchange rate. Estimated results reveal that the determinants of the black market premium are international foreign reserves, real exchange rate, lagged values of the black market premium, expected rate of devaluation, money supply and inflation. On the other hand, inflation and black market are found to Granger-cause each other during the period under consideration.

Suggested Citation

  • Albert Makochekanwa, 2007. "Zimbabwe’s Black Market for Foreign Exchange," Working Papers 200713, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:200713
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.up.ac.za/media/shared/61/WP/wp_2007_13.zp39496.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Mario Cerrato, 2008. "Black Market and Official Exchange Rates: Long-run Equilibrium and Short-run Dynamics," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(3), pages 401-412, August.
    2. Rudiger Dornbusch & Daniel Valente Dantas & Clarice Pechman & Roberto de Rezende Rocha & Demetrio SimÅes, 1983. "The Black Market for Dollars in Brazil," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 98(1), pages 25-40.
    3. Lindauer, David L., 1989. "Parallel, fragmented, or black? Defining market structure in developing economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(12), pages 1871-1880, December.
    4. Granger, Clive W J, 1986. "Developments in the Study of Cointegrated Economic Variables," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 48(3), pages 213-228, August.
    5. Derrese Degefa, 2001. "The Parallel Foreign Exchange Market And Macroeconomic Performance In Ethiopia," Research Papers RP_107, African Economic Research Consortium.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Makochekanwa, Albert & Kwaramba, Marko, 2010. "Dwindling access to basic services in Zimbabwe," MPRA Paper 28271, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Black Market Exchange Rate; Black Market Premium; Foreign Exchange Controls; Cointegration; Granger Causality;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:200713. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Rangan Gupta). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/decupza.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.