IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/96644.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The First Industrial Revolution: Creation of a New Global Human Era

Author

Listed:
  • Mohajan, Haradhan

Abstract

The First Industrial Revolution began in England in about 1750–1760 that lasted to sometime between 1820 and 1840. It is one of the most distinguished turning points in human history. During this period human and animal labour technology transformed into machinery, such as the steam engine, the spinning jenny, coke smelting, puddling and rolling processes for making iron, etc. Industrial Revolution is renewed for global economic growth, increase in production and consumption of common people. The system of transportation communication through canals, road and rails had improved. Also banking and other financial systems improved to run the industries and business firms smoothly. Child and infant mortality rate decreased and fertility rate increased. As a result, population growth had dramatically changed. On the other hand, women and child labour has increased in dangerous and unhygienic condition. Factory workers have to work sixteen hours in a day merely to save the family from starvation. Industrial Revolution created a wide gap between the rich and the poor. An attempt has taken here to describe the various effects of Industrial Revolution.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohajan, Haradhan, 2019. "The First Industrial Revolution: Creation of a New Global Human Era," MPRA Paper 96644, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 17 Jul 2019.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:96644
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/96644/1/MPRA_paper_96644.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Brunt, Liam, 2006. "Rediscovering Risk: Country Banks as Venture Capital Firms in the First Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(1), pages 74-102, March.
    2. Hans-Joachim Voth, 2003. "Living Standards During the Industrial Revolution: An Economist's Guide," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 221-226, May.
    3. Jaume Ventura & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2015. "Debt into growth: How sovereign debt accelerated the first Industrial Revolution," Economics Working Papers 1483, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    4. Veblen, Thorstein, 1915. "Imperial Germany and The Industrial Revolution," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number veblen1915.
    5. Goldin, Claudia & Sokoloff, Kenneth, 1982. "Women, Children, and Industrialization in the Early Republic: Evidence from the Manufacturing Censuses," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 42(4), pages 741-774, December.
    6. Daunton, M. J., 1995. "Progress and Poverty: An Economic and Social History of Britain 1700-1850," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198222811.
    7. Joyce Burnette, 1997. "An Investigation of the Female–Male Wage Gap During the Industrial Revolution in Britain," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 50(2), pages 257-281, May.
    8. Aubhik Khan, 2008. "The industrial revolution and the demographic transition," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q1, pages 9-15.
    9. Gregory Clark, 2007. "The long march of history: Farm wages, population, and economic growth, England 1209–18691," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 60(1), pages 97-135, February.
    10. Maxine Berg & Pat Hudson, 1992. "Rehabilitating the industrial revolution," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 45(1), pages 24-50, February.
    11. Feinstein, Charles H., 1998. "Pessimism Perpetuated: Real Wages and the Standard of Living in Britain during and after the Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 625-658, September.
    12. Gregory Clark, 2007. "Introduction to A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World," Introductory Chapters, in: A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World, Princeton University Press.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrial Revolution; Technological Change; Human Capital; Economic Development;

    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General
    • N5 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:96644. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.